How Can Skin Check Reminders be Personalised to Patient Conscientiousness?

Matthew Gordon Dennis, Kirsten Ailsa Smith, Judith Masthoff, Nava Tintarev

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

Abstract

This paper explores the potential of personalising health reminders to melanoma patients based on their personality (high vs low conscientiousness). We describe a study where we presented participants with a scenario with a fictional patient who has not performed a skin check for recurrent melanoma. The patient was described as either very conscientious, or very unconscientious. We asked participants to rate reminders inspired by Cialdini's 6 principles of persuasion for their suitability for the patient. Participants then chose their favourite reminder and an alternative reminder to send if that one failed. We found that conscientiousness had an effect on both the ratings of reminder types and the most preferred reminders selected by participants.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationUMAP 2015 Extended Proceedings
EditorsAlexandra Cristea, Judith Masthoff, Alan Said, Nava Tintarev
PublisherCEUR-WS
Number of pages12
Volume1388
Publication statusPublished - 2015
EventUMAP workshop: Personalisation and Adaptation in Technology for Health (PATH 2015). - Dublin, Ireland
Duration: 29 Jun 20153 Jul 2015

Publication series

NameCEUR Workshop Proceedings
PublisherCEUR
Volume1388
ISSN (Electronic)1613-0073

Conference

ConferenceUMAP workshop: Personalisation and Adaptation in Technology for Health (PATH 2015).
CountryIreland
CityDublin
Period29/06/153/07/15

Fingerprint

Skin
Melanoma
Persuasive Communication
Personality
Health

Keywords

  • personalised reminders
  • personality
  • persuasion
  • eHealth

Cite this

Dennis, M. G., Smith, K. A., Masthoff, J., & Tintarev, N. (2015). How Can Skin Check Reminders be Personalised to Patient Conscientiousness? In A. Cristea, J. Masthoff, A. Said, & N. Tintarev (Eds.), UMAP 2015 Extended Proceedings (Vol. 1388). (CEUR Workshop Proceedings; Vol. 1388). CEUR-WS.

How Can Skin Check Reminders be Personalised to Patient Conscientiousness? / Dennis, Matthew Gordon; Smith, Kirsten Ailsa; Masthoff, Judith; Tintarev, Nava.

UMAP 2015 Extended Proceedings. ed. / Alexandra Cristea; Judith Masthoff; Alan Said; Nava Tintarev. Vol. 1388 CEUR-WS, 2015. (CEUR Workshop Proceedings; Vol. 1388).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

Dennis, MG, Smith, KA, Masthoff, J & Tintarev, N 2015, How Can Skin Check Reminders be Personalised to Patient Conscientiousness? in A Cristea, J Masthoff, A Said & N Tintarev (eds), UMAP 2015 Extended Proceedings. vol. 1388, CEUR Workshop Proceedings, vol. 1388, CEUR-WS, UMAP workshop: Personalisation and Adaptation in Technology for Health (PATH 2015)., Dublin, Ireland, 29/06/15.
Dennis MG, Smith KA, Masthoff J, Tintarev N. How Can Skin Check Reminders be Personalised to Patient Conscientiousness? In Cristea A, Masthoff J, Said A, Tintarev N, editors, UMAP 2015 Extended Proceedings. Vol. 1388. CEUR-WS. 2015. (CEUR Workshop Proceedings).
Dennis, Matthew Gordon ; Smith, Kirsten Ailsa ; Masthoff, Judith ; Tintarev, Nava. / How Can Skin Check Reminders be Personalised to Patient Conscientiousness?. UMAP 2015 Extended Proceedings. editor / Alexandra Cristea ; Judith Masthoff ; Alan Said ; Nava Tintarev. Vol. 1388 CEUR-WS, 2015. (CEUR Workshop Proceedings).
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