Hydrological impact of broadleaved forestry in the British uplands

implications for water use and water quality

C. Soulsby*, B. Reynolds

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The impact of oak woodland on the quantity and quality of drainage waters were examined in upland Wales and compared to the effects of commercial conifer (spruce) forestry and unafforested moorland. Interception losses from broadleaved woodland are lower than those from coniferous forestry but higher than losses from moorland vegetation. This may lead to reduced water yields if extensive broadleaved planting occurs in headwater catchments. Soil water chemistry also differed between the three land uses; primarily due to the enhanced deposition of atmospherically-derived ions on to tree canopies. The concentration and flux of the mobile anions SO4 and Cl increased in the order bulk precipitation < oak throughfall < spruce throughfall. The enhanced anion loading results in the acidification of soil waters and the mobilization of Al in the two forest soils with the effect being most marked at the conifer site. Whilst broadleaved planting is unlikely to result in the same acidification problems associated with coniferous forestry in upland Britain, care should be taken when planting in acid-sensitive environments.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMan's Influence on Freshwater Ecosystems and Water Use
Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of a Boulder Symposium, July 1995
EditorsG Petts
Place of PublicationWallingford
PublisherA & A Farmar
Pages267-274
Number of pages8
ISBN (Print)094757154X, 978-0947571542
Publication statusPublished - 31 Dec 1998
EventXXI General Assembly of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics - Boulder, CO, United States
Duration: 1 Jul 199514 Jul 1995

Publication series

NameIAHS-AISH Publication
Number230
ISSN (Print)0144-7815

Conference

ConferenceXXI General Assembly of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics
CountryUnited States
CityBoulder, CO
Period1/07/9514/07/95

Fingerprint

water use
forestry
moorland
throughfall
water quality
coniferous tree
acidification
anion
woodland
soil water
water yield
soil chemistry
drainage water
interception
headwater
water chemistry
forest soil
mobilization
canopy
catchment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oceanography
  • Water Science and Technology

Cite this

Soulsby, C., & Reynolds, B. (1998). Hydrological impact of broadleaved forestry in the British uplands: implications for water use and water quality. In G. Petts (Ed.), Man's Influence on Freshwater Ecosystems and Water Use: Proceedings of a Boulder Symposium, July 1995 (pp. 267-274). (IAHS-AISH Publication; No. 230). Wallingford: A & A Farmar.

Hydrological impact of broadleaved forestry in the British uplands : implications for water use and water quality. / Soulsby, C.; Reynolds, B.

Man's Influence on Freshwater Ecosystems and Water Use: Proceedings of a Boulder Symposium, July 1995. ed. / G Petts. Wallingford : A & A Farmar, 1998. p. 267-274 (IAHS-AISH Publication; No. 230).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Soulsby, C & Reynolds, B 1998, Hydrological impact of broadleaved forestry in the British uplands: implications for water use and water quality. in G Petts (ed.), Man's Influence on Freshwater Ecosystems and Water Use: Proceedings of a Boulder Symposium, July 1995. IAHS-AISH Publication, no. 230, A & A Farmar, Wallingford, pp. 267-274, XXI General Assembly of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, Boulder, CO, United States, 1/07/95.
Soulsby C, Reynolds B. Hydrological impact of broadleaved forestry in the British uplands: implications for water use and water quality. In Petts G, editor, Man's Influence on Freshwater Ecosystems and Water Use: Proceedings of a Boulder Symposium, July 1995. Wallingford: A & A Farmar. 1998. p. 267-274. (IAHS-AISH Publication; 230).
Soulsby, C. ; Reynolds, B. / Hydrological impact of broadleaved forestry in the British uplands : implications for water use and water quality. Man's Influence on Freshwater Ecosystems and Water Use: Proceedings of a Boulder Symposium, July 1995. editor / G Petts. Wallingford : A & A Farmar, 1998. pp. 267-274 (IAHS-AISH Publication; 230).
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