Candida albicans switches mates

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The "asexual" human fungal pathogen Candida albicans has recently been engineered to be able to mate. A paper in the August 9, 2002 issue of Cell (Miller and Johnson, 2002) shows that mating competence is increased dramatically when mating partners are in a rare switch variant cell type that does not normally occur at body temperature.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)217-218
Number of pages1
JournalMolecular Cell
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Keywords

  • RECOMBINATION

Cite this

Candida albicans switches mates. / Gow, Neil Andrew Robert.

In: Molecular Cell, Vol. 10, No. 2, 2002, p. 217-218.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gow, Neil Andrew Robert. / Candida albicans switches mates. In: Molecular Cell. 2002 ; Vol. 10, No. 2. pp. 217-218.
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