IMPULSIVITY AND SPEED-ACCURACY STRATEGIES IN INTELLIGENCE-TEST PERFORMANCE

Louise Helen Phillips, P M A RABBITT

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A number of authors have expressed concern about our lack of knowledge of speed-accuracy strategies in intelligence tests. This study examines whether relations between intelligence-test performance and information-processing measures depend on individual differences in speed-accuracy preferences rather than on capacity limitations and whether the impact of strategic variables changes with increasing age or extraversion. Eighty-three volunteers from 50 to 79 years old were compared on 4 tests of intelligence and 3 tests of information-processing rate. Impulsivity indices were computed from intelligence-test performance parameters in order to quantify speed-accuracy preferences. Impulsivity measures from different tests correlated positively, showing that stable strategic preferences exist independently of test ability. There was no evidence that impulsivity was related to extraversion or increasing age. Strategic preferences did not underpin relations between intelligence-test total scores and measures of processing rate. More complete predictions of cognitive task performance could be obtained in future work if both total scores and impulsivity indices are taken from intelligence tests.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)13-29
Number of pages17
JournalIntelligence
Volume21
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1995

Keywords

  • REACTION-TIME
  • REFLECTION-IMPULSIVITY
  • ADULT AGE
  • MODEL
  • TASK
  • CAUTIOUSNESS
  • ERRORS

Cite this

IMPULSIVITY AND SPEED-ACCURACY STRATEGIES IN INTELLIGENCE-TEST PERFORMANCE. / Phillips, Louise Helen; RABBITT, P M A .

In: Intelligence, Vol. 21, No. 1, 1995, p. 13-29.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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