Influence of dietary carbohydrate and protein on colonic fermentation and endogenous formation of N-nitroso compounds

Research output: Contribution to journalAbstract

Abstract

The balance between dietary carbohydrate and protein has been suggested to influence gut fermentation. Negative effects on gut health might be expected if less carbohydrate and more protein reach the large intestine, due to shifts in short chain fatty acid (SCFA) patterns and the formation of potentially carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds (NOC)(2). Nonetheless, high-protein low-carbohydrate diets are popular weight loss regimes. The aim of this study was therefore to assess the impact of diets with varying carbohydrate, protein and energy contents on colonic fermentation products (SCFA) and endogenous formation of NOC.

We conducted a dietary intervention in 18 obese men comparing a body weight maintenance diet (448 ± 50 g/d carbohydrate, 115 ± 13 g/d protein, 13·1 ± 1·4 MJ/d energy) and three weight loss diet (9·0 ± 1·1 MJ/d) containing different levels of carbohydrate (219–308 g/d) and protein (80–156 g/d) to assess the effect of various carbohydrate and protein components. Dietary intakes were estimated from food diaries and faecal fermentation products and NOC were determined as described previously.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)E44
Number of pages1
JournalProceedings of the Nutrition Society
Volume74
Issue numberOCE1
Early online date15 Apr 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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Nitroso Compounds
Dietary Carbohydrates
Dietary Proteins
Fermentation
Carbohydrates
Proteins
Volatile Fatty Acids
Carbohydrate-Restricted Diet
Reducing Diet
Diet
Diet Records
Large Intestine
Weight Loss
Health

Keywords

  • Dietary carbohydrate
  • protein
  • colonic fermentation
  • N-nitroso compounds

Cite this

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title = "Influence of dietary carbohydrate and protein on colonic fermentation and endogenous formation of N-nitroso compounds",
abstract = "The balance between dietary carbohydrate and protein has been suggested to influence gut fermentation. Negative effects on gut health might be expected if less carbohydrate and more protein reach the large intestine, due to shifts in short chain fatty acid (SCFA) patterns and the formation of potentially carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds (NOC)(2). Nonetheless, high-protein low-carbohydrate diets are popular weight loss regimes. The aim of this study was therefore to assess the impact of diets with varying carbohydrate, protein and energy contents on colonic fermentation products (SCFA) and endogenous formation of NOC.We conducted a dietary intervention in 18 obese men comparing a body weight maintenance diet (448 ± 50 g/d carbohydrate, 115 ± 13 g/d protein, 13·1 ± 1·4 MJ/d energy) and three weight loss diet (9·0 ± 1·1 MJ/d) containing different levels of carbohydrate (219–308 g/d) and protein (80–156 g/d) to assess the effect of various carbohydrate and protein components. Dietary intakes were estimated from food diaries and faecal fermentation products and NOC were determined as described previously.",
keywords = "Dietary carbohydrate, protein, colonic fermentation, N-nitroso compounds",
author = "S Gratz and Richardson, {A J} and Duncan, {S H} and Russell, {W R} and C Fyfe and Johnstone, {A M} and Flint, {Harry James} and G Holtrop",
note = "This work was supported by the Scottish Government (Rural & Environment Science & Analytical Services).",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1017/S0029665115000592",
language = "English",
volume = "74",
pages = "E44",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Influence of dietary carbohydrate and protein on colonic fermentation and endogenous formation of N-nitroso compounds

AU - Gratz, S

AU - Richardson, A J

AU - Duncan, S H

AU - Russell, W R

AU - Fyfe, C

AU - Johnstone, A M

AU - Flint, Harry James

AU - Holtrop, G

N1 - This work was supported by the Scottish Government (Rural & Environment Science & Analytical Services).

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - The balance between dietary carbohydrate and protein has been suggested to influence gut fermentation. Negative effects on gut health might be expected if less carbohydrate and more protein reach the large intestine, due to shifts in short chain fatty acid (SCFA) patterns and the formation of potentially carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds (NOC)(2). Nonetheless, high-protein low-carbohydrate diets are popular weight loss regimes. The aim of this study was therefore to assess the impact of diets with varying carbohydrate, protein and energy contents on colonic fermentation products (SCFA) and endogenous formation of NOC.We conducted a dietary intervention in 18 obese men comparing a body weight maintenance diet (448 ± 50 g/d carbohydrate, 115 ± 13 g/d protein, 13·1 ± 1·4 MJ/d energy) and three weight loss diet (9·0 ± 1·1 MJ/d) containing different levels of carbohydrate (219–308 g/d) and protein (80–156 g/d) to assess the effect of various carbohydrate and protein components. Dietary intakes were estimated from food diaries and faecal fermentation products and NOC were determined as described previously.

AB - The balance between dietary carbohydrate and protein has been suggested to influence gut fermentation. Negative effects on gut health might be expected if less carbohydrate and more protein reach the large intestine, due to shifts in short chain fatty acid (SCFA) patterns and the formation of potentially carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds (NOC)(2). Nonetheless, high-protein low-carbohydrate diets are popular weight loss regimes. The aim of this study was therefore to assess the impact of diets with varying carbohydrate, protein and energy contents on colonic fermentation products (SCFA) and endogenous formation of NOC.We conducted a dietary intervention in 18 obese men comparing a body weight maintenance diet (448 ± 50 g/d carbohydrate, 115 ± 13 g/d protein, 13·1 ± 1·4 MJ/d energy) and three weight loss diet (9·0 ± 1·1 MJ/d) containing different levels of carbohydrate (219–308 g/d) and protein (80–156 g/d) to assess the effect of various carbohydrate and protein components. Dietary intakes were estimated from food diaries and faecal fermentation products and NOC were determined as described previously.

KW - Dietary carbohydrate

KW - protein

KW - colonic fermentation

KW - N-nitroso compounds

U2 - 10.1017/S0029665115000592

DO - 10.1017/S0029665115000592

M3 - Abstract

VL - 74

SP - E44

JO - Proceedings of the Nutrition Society

JF - Proceedings of the Nutrition Society

SN - 0029-6651

IS - OCE1

ER -