Integrating ambient noise with GIS for a new perspective on volcano imaging and monitoring: The case study of Mt. Etna

Roberto Guardo, Luca de Siena

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The timely estimation of short- and long-term volcanic hazard relies on the availability of detailed 3D geophysical images of volcanic structures. High-resolution seismic models of the absorbing uppermost conduit systems and highly-heterogeneous shallowest volcanic layers, while particularly challenging to obtain, provide important data to locate feasible eruptive centers and forecast flank collapses and lava ascending paths. Here, we model the volcanic structures of Mt. Etna (Sicily, Italy) and its outskirts using the Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio method, generally applied to industrial and engineering settings. The integration of this technique with Web-based Geographic Information System improves precision during the acquisition phase. It also integrates geological and geophysical visualization of 3D surface and subsurface structures in a queryable environment representing their exact threedimensional geographic position, enhancing interpretation. The results show high-resolution 3D images of the shallowest volcanic and feeding systems, which complement (1) deeper seismic tomography imaging and (2) the results of recent remote sensing imaging. The study recovers a vertical structure that divides the pre-existing volcanic complexes of Ellittico and Cuvigghiuni. This could be interpreted as a transitional phase between the two systems. A comparison with recent remote sensing and geological results, however, shows that anomalies are generally related to volcano-tectonic structures active during the last 17 years. We infer that seismic noise measurements from miniaturized instruments, when combined with remote sensing techniques, represent an important resource to monitor volcanoes in unrest, reducing the risk of loss of human lives and instrumentation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)397-407
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research
Volume347
Early online date16 Oct 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Nov 2017

Fingerprint

ambient noise
Volcanoes
volcanoes
Geographic information systems
volcanology
Remote sensing
volcano
GIS
remote sensing
Imaging techniques
Monitoring
monitoring
Complement C1
seismic noise
seismic tomography
tectonic structure
image resolution
Tectonics
lava
Tomography

Keywords

  • Etna
  • Seismic Imaging
  • Volcano Imaging
  • Instrumental developments
  • GIS-based system
  • HVSR

Cite this

Integrating ambient noise with GIS for a new perspective on volcano imaging and monitoring : The case study of Mt. Etna. / Guardo, Roberto; de Siena, Luca.

In: Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, Vol. 347, 15.11.2017, p. 397-407.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{5493e41f5e504753ab07930e515c1b2b,
title = "Integrating ambient noise with GIS for a new perspective on volcano imaging and monitoring: The case study of Mt. Etna",
abstract = "The timely estimation of short- and long-term volcanic hazard relies on the availability of detailed 3D geophysical images of volcanic structures. High-resolution seismic models of the absorbing uppermost conduit systems and highly-heterogeneous shallowest volcanic layers, while particularly challenging to obtain, provide important data to locate feasible eruptive centers and forecast flank collapses and lava ascending paths. Here, we model the volcanic structures of Mt. Etna (Sicily, Italy) and its outskirts using the Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio method, generally applied to industrial and engineering settings. The integration of this technique with Web-based Geographic Information System improves precision during the acquisition phase. It also integrates geological and geophysical visualization of 3D surface and subsurface structures in a queryable environment representing their exact threedimensional geographic position, enhancing interpretation. The results show high-resolution 3D images of the shallowest volcanic and feeding systems, which complement (1) deeper seismic tomography imaging and (2) the results of recent remote sensing imaging. The study recovers a vertical structure that divides the pre-existing volcanic complexes of Ellittico and Cuvigghiuni. This could be interpreted as a transitional phase between the two systems. A comparison with recent remote sensing and geological results, however, shows that anomalies are generally related to volcano-tectonic structures active during the last 17 years. We infer that seismic noise measurements from miniaturized instruments, when combined with remote sensing techniques, represent an important resource to monitor volcanoes in unrest, reducing the risk of loss of human lives and instrumentation.",
keywords = "Etna, Seismic Imaging, Volcano Imaging, Instrumental developments, GIS-based system, HVSR",
author = "Roberto Guardo and {de Siena}, Luca",
note = "We are very grateful to Professor G. Patane for the inspiration and financial support; S. La Delfa for assistance during the analysis. We also thank the Parco dell’Etna Staff who ensure the permission and regular support above the volcano. We would like to thank G. Vaccino and F. Zuccarello for the support during the field trip. Two anonymous reviewers provided comments that improved both the interpretation of the results and the clarity of the analyses. Finally, we are grateful to S. Castellaro, M. Neri, and G. Di Grazia for providing important methodological explanations, the DEM, and data of volcanic tremor during the period.",
year = "2017",
month = "11",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2017.10.007",
language = "English",
volume = "347",
pages = "397--407",
journal = "Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research",
issn = "0377-0273",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Integrating ambient noise with GIS for a new perspective on volcano imaging and monitoring

T2 - The case study of Mt. Etna

AU - Guardo, Roberto

AU - de Siena, Luca

N1 - We are very grateful to Professor G. Patane for the inspiration and financial support; S. La Delfa for assistance during the analysis. We also thank the Parco dell’Etna Staff who ensure the permission and regular support above the volcano. We would like to thank G. Vaccino and F. Zuccarello for the support during the field trip. Two anonymous reviewers provided comments that improved both the interpretation of the results and the clarity of the analyses. Finally, we are grateful to S. Castellaro, M. Neri, and G. Di Grazia for providing important methodological explanations, the DEM, and data of volcanic tremor during the period.

PY - 2017/11/15

Y1 - 2017/11/15

N2 - The timely estimation of short- and long-term volcanic hazard relies on the availability of detailed 3D geophysical images of volcanic structures. High-resolution seismic models of the absorbing uppermost conduit systems and highly-heterogeneous shallowest volcanic layers, while particularly challenging to obtain, provide important data to locate feasible eruptive centers and forecast flank collapses and lava ascending paths. Here, we model the volcanic structures of Mt. Etna (Sicily, Italy) and its outskirts using the Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio method, generally applied to industrial and engineering settings. The integration of this technique with Web-based Geographic Information System improves precision during the acquisition phase. It also integrates geological and geophysical visualization of 3D surface and subsurface structures in a queryable environment representing their exact threedimensional geographic position, enhancing interpretation. The results show high-resolution 3D images of the shallowest volcanic and feeding systems, which complement (1) deeper seismic tomography imaging and (2) the results of recent remote sensing imaging. The study recovers a vertical structure that divides the pre-existing volcanic complexes of Ellittico and Cuvigghiuni. This could be interpreted as a transitional phase between the two systems. A comparison with recent remote sensing and geological results, however, shows that anomalies are generally related to volcano-tectonic structures active during the last 17 years. We infer that seismic noise measurements from miniaturized instruments, when combined with remote sensing techniques, represent an important resource to monitor volcanoes in unrest, reducing the risk of loss of human lives and instrumentation.

AB - The timely estimation of short- and long-term volcanic hazard relies on the availability of detailed 3D geophysical images of volcanic structures. High-resolution seismic models of the absorbing uppermost conduit systems and highly-heterogeneous shallowest volcanic layers, while particularly challenging to obtain, provide important data to locate feasible eruptive centers and forecast flank collapses and lava ascending paths. Here, we model the volcanic structures of Mt. Etna (Sicily, Italy) and its outskirts using the Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio method, generally applied to industrial and engineering settings. The integration of this technique with Web-based Geographic Information System improves precision during the acquisition phase. It also integrates geological and geophysical visualization of 3D surface and subsurface structures in a queryable environment representing their exact threedimensional geographic position, enhancing interpretation. The results show high-resolution 3D images of the shallowest volcanic and feeding systems, which complement (1) deeper seismic tomography imaging and (2) the results of recent remote sensing imaging. The study recovers a vertical structure that divides the pre-existing volcanic complexes of Ellittico and Cuvigghiuni. This could be interpreted as a transitional phase between the two systems. A comparison with recent remote sensing and geological results, however, shows that anomalies are generally related to volcano-tectonic structures active during the last 17 years. We infer that seismic noise measurements from miniaturized instruments, when combined with remote sensing techniques, represent an important resource to monitor volcanoes in unrest, reducing the risk of loss of human lives and instrumentation.

KW - Etna

KW - Seismic Imaging

KW - Volcano Imaging

KW - Instrumental developments

KW - GIS-based system

KW - HVSR

U2 - 10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2017.10.007

DO - 10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2017.10.007

M3 - Article

VL - 347

SP - 397

EP - 407

JO - Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research

JF - Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research

SN - 0377-0273

ER -