Intellectual engagement and cognitive ability in later life (the "use it or lose it" conjecture)

Longitudinal, prospective study

Roger T. Staff* (Corresponding Author), Michael J. Hogan, Daniel S. Williams, L. J. Whalley

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)
6 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objectives To examine the association between intellectual engagement and cognitive ability in later life, and determine whether the maintenance of intellectual engagement will offset age related cognitive decline. Design Longitudinal, prospective, observational study. Setting Non-clinical volunteers in late middle age (all born in 1936) living independently in northeast Scotland. Participants Sample of 498 volunteers who had taken part in the Scottish Mental Health Survey of 1947, from one birth year (1936). Main outcome measures Cognitive ability and trajectory of cognitive decline in later life. Typical intellectual engagement was measured by a questionnaire, and repeated cognitive measurements of information processing speed and verbal memory were obtained over a 15 year period (recording more than 1200 longitudinal data points for each cognitive test). Results Intellectual engagement was significantly associated with level of cognitive performance in later life, with each point on a 24 point scale accounting for 0.97 standardised cognitive performance (IQ-like) score, for processing speed and 0.71 points for memory (both P<0.05). Engagement in problem solving activities had the largest association with life course cognitive gains, with each point accounting for 0.43 standardised cognitive performance score, for processing speed and 0.36 points for memory (both P<0.05). However, engagement did not influence the trajectory of age related decline in cognitive performance. Engagement in intellectual stimulating activities was associated with early life ability, with correlations between engagement and childhood ability and education being 0.35 and 0.22, respectively (both P<0.01). Conclusion These results show that self reported engagement is not associated with the trajectory of cognitive decline in late life, but is associated with the acquisition of ability during the life course. Overall, findings suggest that high performing adults engage and those that engage more being protected from relative decline.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberk4925
JournalBMJ (Online)
Volume363
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Dec 2018

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Aptitude
Longitudinal Studies
Prospective Studies
Volunteers
Scotland
Health Surveys
Automatic Data Processing
Observational Studies
Mental Health
Maintenance
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Parturition
Education
Cognitive Dysfunction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Intellectual engagement and cognitive ability in later life (the "use it or lose it" conjecture) : Longitudinal, prospective study. / Staff, Roger T. (Corresponding Author); Hogan, Michael J.; Williams, Daniel S.; Whalley, L. J.

In: BMJ (Online), Vol. 363, k4925, 10.12.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objectives To examine the association between intellectual engagement and cognitive ability in later life, and determine whether the maintenance of intellectual engagement will offset age related cognitive decline. Design Longitudinal, prospective, observational study. Setting Non-clinical volunteers in late middle age (all born in 1936) living independently in northeast Scotland. Participants Sample of 498 volunteers who had taken part in the Scottish Mental Health Survey of 1947, from one birth year (1936). Main outcome measures Cognitive ability and trajectory of cognitive decline in later life. Typical intellectual engagement was measured by a questionnaire, and repeated cognitive measurements of information processing speed and verbal memory were obtained over a 15 year period (recording more than 1200 longitudinal data points for each cognitive test). Results Intellectual engagement was significantly associated with level of cognitive performance in later life, with each point on a 24 point scale accounting for 0.97 standardised cognitive performance (IQ-like) score, for processing speed and 0.71 points for memory (both P<0.05). Engagement in problem solving activities had the largest association with life course cognitive gains, with each point accounting for 0.43 standardised cognitive performance score, for processing speed and 0.36 points for memory (both P<0.05). However, engagement did not influence the trajectory of age related decline in cognitive performance. Engagement in intellectual stimulating activities was associated with early life ability, with correlations between engagement and childhood ability and education being 0.35 and 0.22, respectively (both P<0.01). Conclusion These results show that self reported engagement is not associated with the trajectory of cognitive decline in late life, but is associated with the acquisition of ability during the life course. Overall, findings suggest that high performing adults engage and those that engage more being protected from relative decline.",
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