Intervention effects of information and self-regulation on eating fruits and vegetables over two years

Gertraud Stadler, Gabriele Oettingen, Peter M Gollwitzer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

123 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: This study tested whether an intervention that combined information with self-regulation strategies had a better effect on eating fruits and vegetables than an information-only intervention.

DESIGN: Women between age 30 and 50 (N = 255) participated in a 24-month randomized controlled trial comparing two brief interventions: All participants received the same information intervention; participants in the information plus self-regulation group additionally learned a self-regulation technique that integrates mental contrasting with implementation intentions.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Participants reported in daily diaries how many servings of fruits and vegetables they ate per day during 1 week at baseline, and in the first week, 1, 2, 4, and 24 months after intervention.

RESULTS: Participants in both groups ate more fruits and vegetables (0.47 to 1.00 daily servings) than at baseline during the first 4 months after intervention. Two years later, participants in the information plus self-regulation group maintained the higher intake, whereas participants in the information group returned to baseline levels.

CONCLUSION: Adding self-regulation training to an information intervention increased its effectiveness for long-term behavior change.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)274-283
Number of pages10
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2010

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Association Learning
  • Diet
  • Eating
  • Female
  • Follow-Up Studies
  • Fruit
  • Health Promotion
  • Humans
  • Intention
  • Longitudinal Studies
  • Middle Aged
  • Social Control, Informal
  • Vegetables
  • Journal Article
  • Randomized Controlled Trial
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

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