Involvement of aak-2 and insulin-like signalling mutations in the cellular stress response as determined by an in vivo ATP sensor C. elegans strain

Debbie McLaggan, Cristina Lagido, Lesley Anne Glover

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a key role in the regulation of critical ratios of ATP:ADP and ATP:AMP. AMPK is activated by any stress treatment that interferes with ATP levels. C.elegans aak-2 mutants that do not have an active AMP activated protein kinase, were found to be more sensitive than wild type worms to killing by either starvation, high temperature or mitochondrial poisoning (1). Insulin-like signalling mutants also have altered sensitivity to stress. With regards to aging networks, it has recently been shown that lifespan extension caused by daf-2\/insulin-like signalling mutations is highly dependent on aak-2, and that aak-2 and daf-16 function in parallel responding to overlapping but different inputs (2). We are interested in the stress response aspect of this interrelationship and have exposed aak-2 and insulin-like signalling mutants to various stresses. We have chosen stresses known to result in changes in the AMP:ATP ratio such as heat and inhibitors of mitochondrial respiration and stresses such as hyperosmolarity which have unknown effects. We transferred a transgenic firefly luciferase gene to aak-2 (ok524), daf-2 (e1370) and daf-16 (mu86) mutant strains to enable a rapid real time indication of ATP levels in C.elegans following the exposure to the above stresses (3, see also Lagido et al. accompanying abstract). In addition we determined viability after 24h stress exposure by probing of the worms with a needle. We will discuss the interrelationship of aak-2 and insulin-like signalling in the context of the stress response. (1) Apfeld J. et al. Genes & Development (2004) 18: 3004-3009. (2) Curtis R. et al. Aging Cell (2006) 5, 119-126. (3) Lagido C. et al. FEMS Lett. (2001) 36-39.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2007
Event16th International C. elegans Meeting (2007) - Los Angeles, United States
Duration: 27 Jun 20071 Jul 2007

Conference

Conference16th International C. elegans Meeting (2007)
CountryUnited States
CityLos Angeles
Period27/06/071/07/07

Fingerprint

Adenosine Triphosphate
AMP-Activated Protein Kinases
Insulin
Mutation
Adenosine Monophosphate
Firefly Luciferases
Cell Aging
Starvation
Adenosine Diphosphate
Poisoning
Genes
Needles
Respiration
Hot Temperature
Temperature

Cite this

McLaggan, D., Lagido, C., & Glover, L. A. (2007). Involvement of aak-2 and insulin-like signalling mutations in the cellular stress response as determined by an in vivo ATP sensor C. elegans strain. Abstract from 16th International C. elegans Meeting (2007), Los Angeles, United States.

Involvement of aak-2 and insulin-like signalling mutations in the cellular stress response as determined by an in vivo ATP sensor C. elegans strain. / McLaggan, Debbie; Lagido, Cristina; Glover, Lesley Anne.

2007. Abstract from 16th International C. elegans Meeting (2007), Los Angeles, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

McLaggan, D, Lagido, C & Glover, LA 2007, 'Involvement of aak-2 and insulin-like signalling mutations in the cellular stress response as determined by an in vivo ATP sensor C. elegans strain' 16th International C. elegans Meeting (2007), Los Angeles, United States, 27/06/07 - 1/07/07, .
McLaggan D, Lagido C, Glover LA. Involvement of aak-2 and insulin-like signalling mutations in the cellular stress response as determined by an in vivo ATP sensor C. elegans strain. 2007. Abstract from 16th International C. elegans Meeting (2007), Los Angeles, United States.
McLaggan, Debbie ; Lagido, Cristina ; Glover, Lesley Anne. / Involvement of aak-2 and insulin-like signalling mutations in the cellular stress response as determined by an in vivo ATP sensor C. elegans strain. Abstract from 16th International C. elegans Meeting (2007), Los Angeles, United States.
@conference{3439db84763448c8b1b86c0238dc89b2,
title = "Involvement of aak-2 and insulin-like signalling mutations in the cellular stress response as determined by an in vivo ATP sensor C. elegans strain",
abstract = "The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a key role in the regulation of critical ratios of ATP:ADP and ATP:AMP. AMPK is activated by any stress treatment that interferes with ATP levels. C.elegans aak-2 mutants that do not have an active AMP activated protein kinase, were found to be more sensitive than wild type worms to killing by either starvation, high temperature or mitochondrial poisoning (1). Insulin-like signalling mutants also have altered sensitivity to stress. With regards to aging networks, it has recently been shown that lifespan extension caused by daf-2\/insulin-like signalling mutations is highly dependent on aak-2, and that aak-2 and daf-16 function in parallel responding to overlapping but different inputs (2). We are interested in the stress response aspect of this interrelationship and have exposed aak-2 and insulin-like signalling mutants to various stresses. We have chosen stresses known to result in changes in the AMP:ATP ratio such as heat and inhibitors of mitochondrial respiration and stresses such as hyperosmolarity which have unknown effects. We transferred a transgenic firefly luciferase gene to aak-2 (ok524), daf-2 (e1370) and daf-16 (mu86) mutant strains to enable a rapid real time indication of ATP levels in C.elegans following the exposure to the above stresses (3, see also Lagido et al. accompanying abstract). In addition we determined viability after 24h stress exposure by probing of the worms with a needle. We will discuss the interrelationship of aak-2 and insulin-like signalling in the context of the stress response. (1) Apfeld J. et al. Genes & Development (2004) 18: 3004-3009. (2) Curtis R. et al. Aging Cell (2006) 5, 119-126. (3) Lagido C. et al. FEMS Lett. (2001) 36-39.",
author = "Debbie McLaggan and Cristina Lagido and Glover, {Lesley Anne}",
year = "2007",
language = "English",
note = "16th International C. elegans Meeting (2007) ; Conference date: 27-06-2007 Through 01-07-2007",

}

TY - CONF

T1 - Involvement of aak-2 and insulin-like signalling mutations in the cellular stress response as determined by an in vivo ATP sensor C. elegans strain

AU - McLaggan, Debbie

AU - Lagido, Cristina

AU - Glover, Lesley Anne

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a key role in the regulation of critical ratios of ATP:ADP and ATP:AMP. AMPK is activated by any stress treatment that interferes with ATP levels. C.elegans aak-2 mutants that do not have an active AMP activated protein kinase, were found to be more sensitive than wild type worms to killing by either starvation, high temperature or mitochondrial poisoning (1). Insulin-like signalling mutants also have altered sensitivity to stress. With regards to aging networks, it has recently been shown that lifespan extension caused by daf-2\/insulin-like signalling mutations is highly dependent on aak-2, and that aak-2 and daf-16 function in parallel responding to overlapping but different inputs (2). We are interested in the stress response aspect of this interrelationship and have exposed aak-2 and insulin-like signalling mutants to various stresses. We have chosen stresses known to result in changes in the AMP:ATP ratio such as heat and inhibitors of mitochondrial respiration and stresses such as hyperosmolarity which have unknown effects. We transferred a transgenic firefly luciferase gene to aak-2 (ok524), daf-2 (e1370) and daf-16 (mu86) mutant strains to enable a rapid real time indication of ATP levels in C.elegans following the exposure to the above stresses (3, see also Lagido et al. accompanying abstract). In addition we determined viability after 24h stress exposure by probing of the worms with a needle. We will discuss the interrelationship of aak-2 and insulin-like signalling in the context of the stress response. (1) Apfeld J. et al. Genes & Development (2004) 18: 3004-3009. (2) Curtis R. et al. Aging Cell (2006) 5, 119-126. (3) Lagido C. et al. FEMS Lett. (2001) 36-39.

AB - The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a key role in the regulation of critical ratios of ATP:ADP and ATP:AMP. AMPK is activated by any stress treatment that interferes with ATP levels. C.elegans aak-2 mutants that do not have an active AMP activated protein kinase, were found to be more sensitive than wild type worms to killing by either starvation, high temperature or mitochondrial poisoning (1). Insulin-like signalling mutants also have altered sensitivity to stress. With regards to aging networks, it has recently been shown that lifespan extension caused by daf-2\/insulin-like signalling mutations is highly dependent on aak-2, and that aak-2 and daf-16 function in parallel responding to overlapping but different inputs (2). We are interested in the stress response aspect of this interrelationship and have exposed aak-2 and insulin-like signalling mutants to various stresses. We have chosen stresses known to result in changes in the AMP:ATP ratio such as heat and inhibitors of mitochondrial respiration and stresses such as hyperosmolarity which have unknown effects. We transferred a transgenic firefly luciferase gene to aak-2 (ok524), daf-2 (e1370) and daf-16 (mu86) mutant strains to enable a rapid real time indication of ATP levels in C.elegans following the exposure to the above stresses (3, see also Lagido et al. accompanying abstract). In addition we determined viability after 24h stress exposure by probing of the worms with a needle. We will discuss the interrelationship of aak-2 and insulin-like signalling in the context of the stress response. (1) Apfeld J. et al. Genes & Development (2004) 18: 3004-3009. (2) Curtis R. et al. Aging Cell (2006) 5, 119-126. (3) Lagido C. et al. FEMS Lett. (2001) 36-39.

M3 - Abstract

ER -