Local provision of percutaneous coronary intervention increases stenting rates and reduces length of hospital stay in remote regional centre

S. Bruce*, J. A. L. Smith, I. Atherton, S. J. Leslie

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: An early invasive strategy with follow-on percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is recommended in the management of high risk acute coronary syndromes (ACS). This article aimed to assess the impact of a new PCI service in a remote population. 

Method: The study compared patient treatment pre- and post-introduction of the PCI service in a remote regional centre. Patients were identified using ICD discharge code during two 12 week periods ('pre' and 'post' introduction of the new PCI service). Further data was obtained from a catheter laboratory database, electronic patient management systems and clinical notes. Non-parametric statistical tests were used.

Results: There were 182 patients in the pre-PCI group and 204 in the post-PCI group. There were no demographic differences between the groups. Patients admitted post service introduction who required active treatment were more likely to have PCI rather than an angiogram only (p=0.046). Furthermore, patients admitted after the introduction of the PCI service had a shorter period of time from admission to PCI (p=0.002), were less likely to betransferred to another hospital (p<0.001), and on average had a shorter hospital stay (p=0.017). 

Conclusion: A local PCI service in a remote regional centre increased efficiency in the management of patients with ACS with increased rates of PCI, shorter waiting times, reduced requirement for hospital transfer, and shorter length of stay. Nevertheless,many patients still required transfer to other centres. Therefore, maintaining links with other regional centres with clear patient pathways are necessary to provide optimal ACS care to all patients in a rural area.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2136
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalRural and Remote Health
Volume13
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 29 Apr 2013

Fingerprint

Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Length of Stay
Acute Coronary Syndrome
management
increased efficiency
Group
statistical test
Risk Management
International Classification of Diseases
Angiography
rural area
Catheters
Demography
electronics
Databases

Keywords

  • Acute coronary syndromes
  • PCI service
  • Remote and rural
  • Scotland

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Emergency Medical Services
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Local provision of percutaneous coronary intervention increases stenting rates and reduces length of hospital stay in remote regional centre. / Bruce, S.; Smith, J. A. L.; Atherton, I.; Leslie, S. J.

In: Rural and Remote Health, Vol. 13, No. 1, 2136, 29.04.2013, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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