Long-time solids suspension simulations by means of a large-eddy approach

JJ Derksen*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Large-eddy simulations (LES) have been used to study solids dispersion in an unbaffled, tall, turbulently stirred tank equipped with four A310 impellers. Experiments show that in such tanks particles that are heavier than the fluid tend to rise slowly to the top of the tank (Pinelli et al., 2001). The time span of this process (of the order of 20 min, or 20 000 impeller revolutions) makes a concurrent simulation of flow and particle motion unpractical. We propose a method that allows for long-time simulations and makes use of the highly resolved (in space and time) information contained in the LES. In the method, the solid particles are tracked through a series of previously stored fluid flow fields. The results are encouraging, showing indeed the observed, counterintuitive behaviour of the particles with the correct time scale. The simulated steady-state particle concentration profiles are, however, significantly sharper than their experimental counterparts, due to the schematizations involved, and possibly the underestimation of the subgrid-scale velocities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)38-46
Number of pages9
JournalChemical Engineering Research & Design
Volume84
Issue numberA1
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2006

Keywords

  • stirred tankflow
  • large-eddy simulation
  • turbulence
  • solids suspension
  • long-time behaviour
  • CFD
  • RUSHTON TURBINE
  • STIRRED-TANK
  • SCALE-UP
  • DROP SIZE
  • FLOW
  • DISPERSIONS
  • CYCLONE
  • DRIVEN

Cite this

Long-time solids suspension simulations by means of a large-eddy approach. / Derksen, JJ.

In: Chemical Engineering Research & Design, Vol. 84, No. A1, 01.2006, p. 38-46.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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