Maternal Obesity During Pregnancy Associates With Premature Mortality and Major Cardiovascular Events in Later Life

Kuan Ken Lee, Edwin A. Raja, Amanda J. Lee, Sohinee Bhattacharya, Siladitya Bhattacharya, Jane E Norman, Rebecca M Reynolds (Corresponding Author)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

One in 5 pregnant women is obese but the impact on later health is unknown. We aimed to determine whether maternal obesity during pregnancy associates with increased premature mortality and later life major cardiovascular events. Maternity records of women who gave birth to their first child between 1950 and 1976 (n=18 873) from the Aberdeen Maternity and Neonatal databank were linked to the National Register of Deaths, Scotland and Scottish Morbidity Record. The effect of maternal obesity at first antenatal visit on death and hospital admissions for cardiovascular events was tested using time-to-event analysis with Cox proportional hazard regression to compare outcomes of mothers in underweight, overweight, or obese body mass index (BMI) categories compared with normal BMI. Median follow-up was at 73 years. All-cause mortality was increased in women who were obese during pregnancy (BMI>30 kg/m2) versus normal BMI after adjustment for socioeconomic status, smoking, gestation at BMI measurement, preeclampsia, and low birth weight (hazard ratio, 1.35; 95% confidence interval, 1.02–1.77). In adjusted models, overweight and obese mothers had increased risk of hospital admission for a cardiovascular event (1.16; 1.06–1.27 and 1.26; 1.01–1.57) compared with normal BMI mothers. Adjustment for parity largely unchanged the hazard ratios (mortality: 1.43, 1.09–1.88; cardiovascular events overweight: 1.17, 1.07–1.29; and obese: 1.30, 1.04–1.62). In conclusion, maternal obesity is associated with increased risk of premature death and cardiovascular disease. Pregnancy and early postpartum could represent an opportunity for interventions to identify obesity and reduce its adverse consequences.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)938-944
Number of pages7
JournalHypertension
Volume66
Issue number5
Early online date14 Sep 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Premature Mortality
Body Mass Index
Obesity
Mothers
Pregnancy
Mortality
Thinness
Scotland
Low Birth Weight Infant
Pre-Eclampsia
Parity
Social Class
Postpartum Period
Pregnant Women
Cardiovascular Diseases
Smoking
Parturition
Databases
Confidence Intervals
Morbidity

Keywords

  • obesity
  • BMI
  • pregnancy
  • cardiovascular disease
  • death
  • body mass index

Cite this

Maternal Obesity During Pregnancy Associates With Premature Mortality and Major Cardiovascular Events in Later Life. / Lee, Kuan Ken; Raja, Edwin A.; Lee, Amanda J.; Bhattacharya, Sohinee; Bhattacharya, Siladitya; Norman, Jane E; Reynolds, Rebecca M (Corresponding Author).

In: Hypertension, Vol. 66, No. 5, 2015, p. 938-944.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "One in 5 pregnant women is obese but the impact on later health is unknown. We aimed to determine whether maternal obesity during pregnancy associates with increased premature mortality and later life major cardiovascular events. Maternity records of women who gave birth to their first child between 1950 and 1976 (n=18 873) from the Aberdeen Maternity and Neonatal databank were linked to the National Register of Deaths, Scotland and Scottish Morbidity Record. The effect of maternal obesity at first antenatal visit on death and hospital admissions for cardiovascular events was tested using time-to-event analysis with Cox proportional hazard regression to compare outcomes of mothers in underweight, overweight, or obese body mass index (BMI) categories compared with normal BMI. Median follow-up was at 73 years. All-cause mortality was increased in women who were obese during pregnancy (BMI>30 kg/m2) versus normal BMI after adjustment for socioeconomic status, smoking, gestation at BMI measurement, preeclampsia, and low birth weight (hazard ratio, 1.35; 95{\%} confidence interval, 1.02–1.77). In adjusted models, overweight and obese mothers had increased risk of hospital admission for a cardiovascular event (1.16; 1.06–1.27 and 1.26; 1.01–1.57) compared with normal BMI mothers. Adjustment for parity largely unchanged the hazard ratios (mortality: 1.43, 1.09–1.88; cardiovascular events overweight: 1.17, 1.07–1.29; and obese: 1.30, 1.04–1.62). In conclusion, maternal obesity is associated with increased risk of premature death and cardiovascular disease. Pregnancy and early postpartum could represent an opportunity for interventions to identify obesity and reduce its adverse consequences.",
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note = "Acknowledgements We thank Ms Katie Wilde, Data Management Team, University of Aberdeen and Lynsey Waugh, Information and Services Division of NHS Scotland for their help with data extraction and linkage. Funding sources This work was supported by funding from the Chief Scientist Office, Scotland. We also acknowledge support from Tommy’s and the British Heart Foundation. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. None of the authors are related to any of the funders",
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N1 - Acknowledgements We thank Ms Katie Wilde, Data Management Team, University of Aberdeen and Lynsey Waugh, Information and Services Division of NHS Scotland for their help with data extraction and linkage. Funding sources This work was supported by funding from the Chief Scientist Office, Scotland. We also acknowledge support from Tommy’s and the British Heart Foundation. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. None of the authors are related to any of the funders

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N2 - One in 5 pregnant women is obese but the impact on later health is unknown. We aimed to determine whether maternal obesity during pregnancy associates with increased premature mortality and later life major cardiovascular events. Maternity records of women who gave birth to their first child between 1950 and 1976 (n=18 873) from the Aberdeen Maternity and Neonatal databank were linked to the National Register of Deaths, Scotland and Scottish Morbidity Record. The effect of maternal obesity at first antenatal visit on death and hospital admissions for cardiovascular events was tested using time-to-event analysis with Cox proportional hazard regression to compare outcomes of mothers in underweight, overweight, or obese body mass index (BMI) categories compared with normal BMI. Median follow-up was at 73 years. All-cause mortality was increased in women who were obese during pregnancy (BMI>30 kg/m2) versus normal BMI after adjustment for socioeconomic status, smoking, gestation at BMI measurement, preeclampsia, and low birth weight (hazard ratio, 1.35; 95% confidence interval, 1.02–1.77). In adjusted models, overweight and obese mothers had increased risk of hospital admission for a cardiovascular event (1.16; 1.06–1.27 and 1.26; 1.01–1.57) compared with normal BMI mothers. Adjustment for parity largely unchanged the hazard ratios (mortality: 1.43, 1.09–1.88; cardiovascular events overweight: 1.17, 1.07–1.29; and obese: 1.30, 1.04–1.62). In conclusion, maternal obesity is associated with increased risk of premature death and cardiovascular disease. Pregnancy and early postpartum could represent an opportunity for interventions to identify obesity and reduce its adverse consequences.

AB - One in 5 pregnant women is obese but the impact on later health is unknown. We aimed to determine whether maternal obesity during pregnancy associates with increased premature mortality and later life major cardiovascular events. Maternity records of women who gave birth to their first child between 1950 and 1976 (n=18 873) from the Aberdeen Maternity and Neonatal databank were linked to the National Register of Deaths, Scotland and Scottish Morbidity Record. The effect of maternal obesity at first antenatal visit on death and hospital admissions for cardiovascular events was tested using time-to-event analysis with Cox proportional hazard regression to compare outcomes of mothers in underweight, overweight, or obese body mass index (BMI) categories compared with normal BMI. Median follow-up was at 73 years. All-cause mortality was increased in women who were obese during pregnancy (BMI>30 kg/m2) versus normal BMI after adjustment for socioeconomic status, smoking, gestation at BMI measurement, preeclampsia, and low birth weight (hazard ratio, 1.35; 95% confidence interval, 1.02–1.77). In adjusted models, overweight and obese mothers had increased risk of hospital admission for a cardiovascular event (1.16; 1.06–1.27 and 1.26; 1.01–1.57) compared with normal BMI mothers. Adjustment for parity largely unchanged the hazard ratios (mortality: 1.43, 1.09–1.88; cardiovascular events overweight: 1.17, 1.07–1.29; and obese: 1.30, 1.04–1.62). In conclusion, maternal obesity is associated with increased risk of premature death and cardiovascular disease. Pregnancy and early postpartum could represent an opportunity for interventions to identify obesity and reduce its adverse consequences.

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