Medical student attitudes toward older people and willingness to consider a career in geriatric medicine

Niall J. Hughes, Roy L. Soiza, Melvin Chua, Graeme E. Hoyle, Allan MacDonald, William R. Primrose, D. Gwyn Seymour

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

84 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the attitudes of first- and fourth-year medical students toward older people and the relationship between these attitudes and possible career choice. To examine the effects of an intensive geriatric medicine (GM) teaching program on these attitudes and career aspirations.

DESIGN: Observational study.

SETTING: University of Aberdeen.

PARTICIPANTS: Medical students.

MEASUREMENTS: In September 2005, first-year students (n=163) at the start of their undergraduate training completed a questionnaire based on the University of California at Los Angeles Geriatrics Attitudes Scale. Students were asked how likely they were to consider a career in GM in the future on a 5-point Likert scale. From the beginning of the academic year 2005/06, fourth-year students completed the same questionnaire before and after an intensive 8-day GM teaching program.

RESULTS: First-year medical students had a mean attitude score +/- standard deviation of 3.69 +/- 0.39. A more-positive attitude increased the likelihood of considering a career in GM (P<.001). Fourth-year students had better attitude scores than first-year students (3.86 +/- 0.36, P=.002). The GM teaching program did not significantly affect attitude scores but significantly increased the willingness to consider a career in GM by a mean 0.52 points (95% confidence interval=0.35-0.70, P<.001).

CONCLUSION: Attitudes toward older people were better in fourth-year than first-year medical students. A more-positive attitude toward older people increased the likelihood of considering a career in GM. An intensive 8-day course in GM had no significant effect on attitudes but increased the likelihood of fourth-year students considering a career in GM.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)334-338
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume56
Issue number2
Early online date26 Dec 2007
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2008

Keywords

  • medical students
  • attitudes
  • older people
  • education
  • career aspirations
  • knowledge
  • residents
  • experience

Cite this

Medical student attitudes toward older people and willingness to consider a career in geriatric medicine. / Hughes, Niall J.; Soiza, Roy L.; Chua, Melvin; Hoyle, Graeme E.; MacDonald, Allan; Primrose, William R.; Seymour, D. Gwyn.

In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Vol. 56, No. 2, 02.2008, p. 334-338.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hughes, Niall J. ; Soiza, Roy L. ; Chua, Melvin ; Hoyle, Graeme E. ; MacDonald, Allan ; Primrose, William R. ; Seymour, D. Gwyn. / Medical student attitudes toward older people and willingness to consider a career in geriatric medicine. In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. 2008 ; Vol. 56, No. 2. pp. 334-338.
@article{e6760e6782954c27a3d223e7685601d2,
title = "Medical student attitudes toward older people and willingness to consider a career in geriatric medicine",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the attitudes of first- and fourth-year medical students toward older people and the relationship between these attitudes and possible career choice. To examine the effects of an intensive geriatric medicine (GM) teaching program on these attitudes and career aspirations.DESIGN: Observational study.SETTING: University of Aberdeen.PARTICIPANTS: Medical students.MEASUREMENTS: In September 2005, first-year students (n=163) at the start of their undergraduate training completed a questionnaire based on the University of California at Los Angeles Geriatrics Attitudes Scale. Students were asked how likely they were to consider a career in GM in the future on a 5-point Likert scale. From the beginning of the academic year 2005/06, fourth-year students completed the same questionnaire before and after an intensive 8-day GM teaching program.RESULTS: First-year medical students had a mean attitude score +/- standard deviation of 3.69 +/- 0.39. A more-positive attitude increased the likelihood of considering a career in GM (P<.001). Fourth-year students had better attitude scores than first-year students (3.86 +/- 0.36, P=.002). The GM teaching program did not significantly affect attitude scores but significantly increased the willingness to consider a career in GM by a mean 0.52 points (95{\%} confidence interval=0.35-0.70, P<.001).CONCLUSION: Attitudes toward older people were better in fourth-year than first-year medical students. A more-positive attitude toward older people increased the likelihood of considering a career in GM. An intensive 8-day course in GM had no significant effect on attitudes but increased the likelihood of fourth-year students considering a career in GM.",
keywords = "medical students, attitudes, older people, education, career aspirations, knowledge, residents, experience",
author = "Hughes, {Niall J.} and Soiza, {Roy L.} and Melvin Chua and Hoyle, {Graeme E.} and Allan MacDonald and Primrose, {William R.} and Seymour, {D. Gwyn}",
year = "2008",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1111/j.1532-5415.2007.01552.x",
language = "English",
volume = "56",
pages = "334--338",
journal = "Journal of the American Geriatrics Society",
issn = "0002-8614",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Medical student attitudes toward older people and willingness to consider a career in geriatric medicine

AU - Hughes, Niall J.

AU - Soiza, Roy L.

AU - Chua, Melvin

AU - Hoyle, Graeme E.

AU - MacDonald, Allan

AU - Primrose, William R.

AU - Seymour, D. Gwyn

PY - 2008/2

Y1 - 2008/2

N2 - OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the attitudes of first- and fourth-year medical students toward older people and the relationship between these attitudes and possible career choice. To examine the effects of an intensive geriatric medicine (GM) teaching program on these attitudes and career aspirations.DESIGN: Observational study.SETTING: University of Aberdeen.PARTICIPANTS: Medical students.MEASUREMENTS: In September 2005, first-year students (n=163) at the start of their undergraduate training completed a questionnaire based on the University of California at Los Angeles Geriatrics Attitudes Scale. Students were asked how likely they were to consider a career in GM in the future on a 5-point Likert scale. From the beginning of the academic year 2005/06, fourth-year students completed the same questionnaire before and after an intensive 8-day GM teaching program.RESULTS: First-year medical students had a mean attitude score +/- standard deviation of 3.69 +/- 0.39. A more-positive attitude increased the likelihood of considering a career in GM (P<.001). Fourth-year students had better attitude scores than first-year students (3.86 +/- 0.36, P=.002). The GM teaching program did not significantly affect attitude scores but significantly increased the willingness to consider a career in GM by a mean 0.52 points (95% confidence interval=0.35-0.70, P<.001).CONCLUSION: Attitudes toward older people were better in fourth-year than first-year medical students. A more-positive attitude toward older people increased the likelihood of considering a career in GM. An intensive 8-day course in GM had no significant effect on attitudes but increased the likelihood of fourth-year students considering a career in GM.

AB - OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the attitudes of first- and fourth-year medical students toward older people and the relationship between these attitudes and possible career choice. To examine the effects of an intensive geriatric medicine (GM) teaching program on these attitudes and career aspirations.DESIGN: Observational study.SETTING: University of Aberdeen.PARTICIPANTS: Medical students.MEASUREMENTS: In September 2005, first-year students (n=163) at the start of their undergraduate training completed a questionnaire based on the University of California at Los Angeles Geriatrics Attitudes Scale. Students were asked how likely they were to consider a career in GM in the future on a 5-point Likert scale. From the beginning of the academic year 2005/06, fourth-year students completed the same questionnaire before and after an intensive 8-day GM teaching program.RESULTS: First-year medical students had a mean attitude score +/- standard deviation of 3.69 +/- 0.39. A more-positive attitude increased the likelihood of considering a career in GM (P<.001). Fourth-year students had better attitude scores than first-year students (3.86 +/- 0.36, P=.002). The GM teaching program did not significantly affect attitude scores but significantly increased the willingness to consider a career in GM by a mean 0.52 points (95% confidence interval=0.35-0.70, P<.001).CONCLUSION: Attitudes toward older people were better in fourth-year than first-year medical students. A more-positive attitude toward older people increased the likelihood of considering a career in GM. An intensive 8-day course in GM had no significant effect on attitudes but increased the likelihood of fourth-year students considering a career in GM.

KW - medical students

KW - attitudes

KW - older people

KW - education

KW - career aspirations

KW - knowledge

KW - residents

KW - experience

U2 - 10.1111/j.1532-5415.2007.01552.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1532-5415.2007.01552.x

M3 - Article

VL - 56

SP - 334

EP - 338

JO - Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

JF - Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

SN - 0002-8614

IS - 2

ER -