Minor Illness and Injury: Factors Influencing Attendance at a Paediatric Accident and Emergency Department

S. Hendry, T. Beattie, David James Heaney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: To gather information on children with minor illness or injury presenting to a paediatric accident and emergency (A&E) department and the decision making process leading to their attendance.

Methods: Prospective questionnaire based survey of 465 children selected by systematic sampling from A&E attenders allocated to the lowest triage category.

Results: The study population was statistically representative of the total population of A&E attenders. The lower deprivation categories were over represented. Educational attainment, childcare experience, and parental coping skills were important in relation to A&E attendance. More children attended with injury as opposed to illness. There were no significant demographic differences between those children who presented directly to A&E and those who made prior contact with a GP. Just under half the study population had made contact with a general practitioner ( GP) before attending A&E. The majority of those children were directly referred to A&E at that point. GPs referred equivalent numbers of children with illness and injury.

Conclusions: Parents and GPs view paediatric A&E departments as an appropriate place to seek treatment for children with minor illness or injury.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)629-633
Number of pages4
JournalArchives of Disease in Childhood
Volume90
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Keywords

  • GENERAL-PRACTICE
  • CONSULTATION PATTERNS
  • PATIENT SATISFACTION
  • PRESCHOOL-CHILDREN
  • PRIMARY-CARE
  • ACUTELY ILL
  • INAPPROPRIATE
  • BEHAVIOR
  • PARENTS
  • RATES

Cite this

Minor Illness and Injury: Factors Influencing Attendance at a Paediatric Accident and Emergency Department. / Hendry, S.; Beattie, T.; Heaney, David James.

In: Archives of Disease in Childhood, Vol. 90, 2005, p. 629-633.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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