Missions, Unions and Indigenous Organization in the Bolivian Amazon

Placing the Formation of an Indigenous Organization in its Context

Chuck Sturtevant (Corresponding Author)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This article explores oral histories about the foundation of the Mosetén Indigenous People’s Organization (OPIM) in Bolivia. In so doing it aims to add nuance to scholarship on Bolivian social movements from 1990 to 2010 by focusing on connections and continuities between indigenous organizations and the systems of political association that predate them. Efforts to organize Mosetén communities were spurred at least in part by indigenous desire to establish order within their communities and to resolve local problems. They adopted strategies associated with models of social organization that were already familiar to them, particularly the Franciscan missions and agrarian unions, and adapted them to meet their needs. This process involved ongoing interactions between Mosetén yearnings, a particular political and historical context, and the creative capacities of Mosetén leaders.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)770-784
Number of pages15
JournalLatin American Research Review
Volume53
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Dec 2018

Fingerprint

monastic order
organization
oral history
Bolivia
Social Movements
community
continuity
leader
interaction

Cite this

Missions, Unions and Indigenous Organization in the Bolivian Amazon : Placing the Formation of an Indigenous Organization in its Context. / Sturtevant, Chuck (Corresponding Author).

In: Latin American Research Review, Vol. 53, No. 4, 20.12.2018, p. 770-784.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{63a61ffa14f3464b9e7d5f2642636032,
title = "Missions, Unions and Indigenous Organization in the Bolivian Amazon: Placing the Formation of an Indigenous Organization in its Context",
abstract = "This article explores oral histories about the foundation of the Moset{\'e}n Indigenous People’s Organization (OPIM) in Bolivia. In so doing it aims to add nuance to scholarship on Bolivian social movements from 1990 to 2010 by focusing on connections and continuities between indigenous organizations and the systems of political association that predate them. Efforts to organize Moset{\'e}n communities were spurred at least in part by indigenous desire to establish order within their communities and to resolve local problems. They adopted strategies associated with models of social organization that were already familiar to them, particularly the Franciscan missions and agrarian unions, and adapted them to meet their needs. This process involved ongoing interactions between Moset{\'e}n yearnings, a particular political and historical context, and the creative capacities of Moset{\'e}n leaders.",
author = "Chuck Sturtevant",
note = "This article has benefited from the input of several scholars, notably Daniela Ricco, Amy Kennemore, Elizabeth Ryan, Isabelle Comb{\`e}s, Zulema Lehm, Pedro Pachaguaya Yujra, Oscar Vega Camacho, and three anonymous reviewers, as well as the editors of Latin American Research Review. I’m grateful for their time and thoughtful criticism. Further I am grateful, as always, to the residents of the Moset{\'e}n TCO who have taken the time to teach me, particularly to the leaders and former leaders who took the time to share their experiences with me. Lastly, I owe a special debt of gratitude to Don Juan Huasna, who took the time to remember.",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
day = "20",
doi = "10.25222/larr.391",
language = "English",
volume = "53",
pages = "770--784",
journal = "Latin American Research Review",
issn = "1542-4278",
publisher = "Latin American Studies Association",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Missions, Unions and Indigenous Organization in the Bolivian Amazon

T2 - Placing the Formation of an Indigenous Organization in its Context

AU - Sturtevant, Chuck

N1 - This article has benefited from the input of several scholars, notably Daniela Ricco, Amy Kennemore, Elizabeth Ryan, Isabelle Combès, Zulema Lehm, Pedro Pachaguaya Yujra, Oscar Vega Camacho, and three anonymous reviewers, as well as the editors of Latin American Research Review. I’m grateful for their time and thoughtful criticism. Further I am grateful, as always, to the residents of the Mosetén TCO who have taken the time to teach me, particularly to the leaders and former leaders who took the time to share their experiences with me. Lastly, I owe a special debt of gratitude to Don Juan Huasna, who took the time to remember.

PY - 2018/12/20

Y1 - 2018/12/20

N2 - This article explores oral histories about the foundation of the Mosetén Indigenous People’s Organization (OPIM) in Bolivia. In so doing it aims to add nuance to scholarship on Bolivian social movements from 1990 to 2010 by focusing on connections and continuities between indigenous organizations and the systems of political association that predate them. Efforts to organize Mosetén communities were spurred at least in part by indigenous desire to establish order within their communities and to resolve local problems. They adopted strategies associated with models of social organization that were already familiar to them, particularly the Franciscan missions and agrarian unions, and adapted them to meet their needs. This process involved ongoing interactions between Mosetén yearnings, a particular political and historical context, and the creative capacities of Mosetén leaders.

AB - This article explores oral histories about the foundation of the Mosetén Indigenous People’s Organization (OPIM) in Bolivia. In so doing it aims to add nuance to scholarship on Bolivian social movements from 1990 to 2010 by focusing on connections and continuities between indigenous organizations and the systems of political association that predate them. Efforts to organize Mosetén communities were spurred at least in part by indigenous desire to establish order within their communities and to resolve local problems. They adopted strategies associated with models of social organization that were already familiar to them, particularly the Franciscan missions and agrarian unions, and adapted them to meet their needs. This process involved ongoing interactions between Mosetén yearnings, a particular political and historical context, and the creative capacities of Mosetén leaders.

U2 - 10.25222/larr.391

DO - 10.25222/larr.391

M3 - Article

VL - 53

SP - 770

EP - 784

JO - Latin American Research Review

JF - Latin American Research Review

SN - 1542-4278

IS - 4

ER -