Molecular systematics of Acarus siro s. lat., a complex of stored food pests

Lucy Webster, R. H. Thomas, G. P. McCormack

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    22 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The astigmatid mite Acarus siro (Linnaeus 1758) is an important agricultural pest and environmental allergen. However, it is likely that many mites described in the literature as A. siro, collected from both outdoor and stored product habitats, may belong to one of its sibling species, A. farris [Ent. Ber. Amst. 2 (26) (1905) 20] or A. immobilis [Bull. Br. Mus. Nat. Hist. 11 (1964a) 413; Acarologia. 6 (Suppl) (1964) 101]. The three species are difficult to separate morphologically, gene exchange between some of them is possible and, although each species displays environmental preferences, they occur together in some environments. This raises a question about their separate species status. In a pilot study, we investigated whether genetic data supported the separate species status of these forms. Both nuclear (the second internal transcribed spacer region [ITS-2] of the ribosomal cistron) and mitochondrial (cytochrome oxidase subunit I, mtcoxI hereafter) loci were employed for this purpose. MtcoxI data does not conflict the differentiation into three separate species and while the ITS2 data were problematic for this group of mites it suggested that a congener, Acarus gracilis [Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. 10 (1957) 753], is basal to the A. siro species complex. (C) 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)817-822
    Number of pages5
    JournalMolecular Phylogenetics and Evolution
    Volume32
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 2004

    Keywords

    • Acarus
    • acari
    • species complex
    • cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1
    • 28S rRNA D3
    • ITS2
    • INTERNAL TRANSCRIBED SPACERS
    • SPECIES COMPLEX
    • RIBOSOMAL DNA
    • STORAGE MITES
    • SEQUENCES
    • IDENTIFICATION
    • PHYLOGENY
    • EVOLUTION
    • MOSQUITO
    • ALLERGY

    Cite this