Nitrosative and oxidative stress responses in fungal pathogenicity

Alistair J P Brown, Ken Haynes, Janet Quinn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

102 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fungal pathogenicity has arisen in polyphyletic manner during evolution, yielding fungal pathogens with diverse infection strategies and with differing degrees of evolutionary adaptation to their human host. Not surprisingly, these fungal pathogens display differing degrees of resistance to the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species used by human cells to counteract infection. Furthermore, whilst evolutionarily conserved regulators, such as Hog1, are central to such stress responses in many fungal pathogens, species-specific differences in their roles and regulation abound. In contrast, there is a high degree of commonality in the cellular responses to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species evoked in evolutionarily divergent fungal pathogens.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)384-391
Number of pages8
JournalCurrent Opinion in Microbiology
Volume12
Issue number4
Early online date16 Jul 2009
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2009

Fingerprint

Reactive Nitrogen Species
Virulence
Reactive Oxygen Species
Oxidative Stress
Infection

Keywords

  • antifungal agents
  • fungi
  • host-pathogen interactions
  • humans
  • models, biological
  • nitroso compounds
  • oxidants
  • oxidative stress
  • stress, physiological

Cite this

Nitrosative and oxidative stress responses in fungal pathogenicity. / Brown, Alistair J P; Haynes, Ken; Quinn, Janet.

In: Current Opinion in Microbiology, Vol. 12, No. 4, 08.2009, p. 384-391.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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