Pole-to-Pole Connections: Similarities between Arctic and Antarctic Microbiomes and Their Vulnerability to Environmental Change

Julia Kleinteich, Falk Hildebrand, Mohammad Bahram, Anita Y. Voigt, Susanna A. Wood, Anne D. Jungblut, Frithjof C. Küpper, Antonio Quesada, Antonio Camacho, David A. Pearce, Peter Convey, Warwick F. Vincent, Christiane Zarfl, Peer Bork, Daniel R. Dietrich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The global biogeography of microorganisms remains poorly resolved, which limits the current understanding of microbial resilience towards environmental changes. Using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, we characterized the microbial diversity of terrestrial and lacustrine biofilms from the Arctic, Antarctic and temperate regions. Our analyses suggest that bacterial community compositions at the poles are more similar to each other than they are to geographically closer temperate habitats, with 32 % of all operational taxonomic units (OTUs) co-occurring in both polar regions. While specific microbial taxa were confined to distinct regions, representing potentially endemic populations, the percentage of cosmopolitan taxa was higher in Arctic (43 %) than in Antarctic samples (36 %). The overlap in polar microbial OTUs may be explained by natural or anthropogenically-mediated dispersal in combination with environmental filtering. Current and future changing environmental conditions may enhance microbial invasion, establishment of cosmopolitan genotypes and loss of endemic taxa.
Original languageEnglish
Article number137
JournalFrontiers in Ecology and Evolution
Volume5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Nov 2017

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environmental change
vulnerability
polar region
biogeography
community composition
biofilm
genotype
microorganism
environmental conditions
gene
habitat
loss

Keywords

  • biogeography
  • diversity
  • microbiology
  • polar regions
  • ecology
  • high-throuput sequencing
  • 16S rRNA gene

Cite this

Pole-to-Pole Connections : Similarities between Arctic and Antarctic Microbiomes and Their Vulnerability to Environmental Change. / Kleinteich, Julia; Hildebrand, Falk; Bahram, Mohammad; Voigt, Anita Y.; Wood, Susanna A.; Jungblut, Anne D.; Küpper, Frithjof C.; Quesada, Antonio; Camacho, Antonio; Pearce, David A.; Convey, Peter; Vincent, Warwick F.; Zarfl, Christiane; Bork, Peer; Dietrich, Daniel R.

In: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, Vol. 5, 137, 10.11.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kleinteich, J, Hildebrand, F, Bahram, M, Voigt, AY, Wood, SA, Jungblut, AD, Küpper, FC, Quesada, A, Camacho, A, Pearce, DA, Convey, P, Vincent, WF, Zarfl, C, Bork, P & Dietrich, DR 2017, 'Pole-to-Pole Connections: Similarities between Arctic and Antarctic Microbiomes and Their Vulnerability to Environmental Change', Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, vol. 5, 137. https://doi.org/10.3389/fevo.2017.00137
Kleinteich, Julia ; Hildebrand, Falk ; Bahram, Mohammad ; Voigt, Anita Y. ; Wood, Susanna A. ; Jungblut, Anne D. ; Küpper, Frithjof C. ; Quesada, Antonio ; Camacho, Antonio ; Pearce, David A. ; Convey, Peter ; Vincent, Warwick F. ; Zarfl, Christiane ; Bork, Peer ; Dietrich, Daniel R. / Pole-to-Pole Connections : Similarities between Arctic and Antarctic Microbiomes and Their Vulnerability to Environmental Change. In: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution. 2017 ; Vol. 5.
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abstract = "The global biogeography of microorganisms remains poorly resolved, which limits the current understanding of microbial resilience towards environmental changes. Using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, we characterized the microbial diversity of terrestrial and lacustrine biofilms from the Arctic, Antarctic and temperate regions. Our analyses suggest that bacterial community compositions at the poles are more similar to each other than they are to geographically closer temperate habitats, with 32 {\%} of all operational taxonomic units (OTUs) co-occurring in both polar regions. While specific microbial taxa were confined to distinct regions, representing potentially endemic populations, the percentage of cosmopolitan taxa was higher in Arctic (43 {\%}) than in Antarctic samples (36 {\%}). The overlap in polar microbial OTUs may be explained by natural or anthropogenically-mediated dispersal in combination with environmental filtering. Current and future changing environmental conditions may enhance microbial invasion, establishment of cosmopolitan genotypes and loss of endemic taxa.",
keywords = "biogeography, diversity, microbiology, polar regions, ecology, high-throuput sequencing, 16S rRNA gene",
author = "Julia Kleinteich and Falk Hildebrand and Mohammad Bahram and Voigt, {Anita Y.} and Wood, {Susanna A.} and Jungblut, {Anne D.} and K{\"u}pper, {Frithjof C.} and Antonio Quesada and Antonio Camacho and Pearce, {David A.} and Peter Convey and Vincent, {Warwick F.} and Christiane Zarfl and Peer Bork and Dietrich, {Daniel R.}",
note = "Acknowledgments JK acknowledges the Carl Zeiss foundation for PhD funding, the Marie-Curie COFUND-BEIPD PostDoc fellowship for PostDoc funding, FNRS travel funding and the logistical and financial support by UNIS. JK and FK acknowledge the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Antarctic Funding Initiative AFI-CGS-70 (collaborative gearing scheme) and logistic support from the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) for field work in Antarctica. JK and CZ acknowledge the Excellence Initiative at the University of T{\"u}bingen funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research and the German Research Foundation (DFG). FH, AV, and PB received funding from MetaHIT (HEALTH-F4-2007-201052), Microbios (ERC-AdG-502 669830) and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL). We thank members of the Bork group at EMBL for helpful discussions. We acknowledge the EMBL Genomics Core Facility for sequencing support and Y. P. Yuan and the EMBL Information Technology Core Facility for support with high-performance computing and EMBL for financial support. PC is supported by NERC core funding to the BAS “Biodiversity, Evolution and Adaptation” Team. MB was funded by Helge Ax:son Johnsons Stiftelse and PUT1317. DRD acknowledges the DFG funded project DI698/18-1 Dietrich and the Marie Curie International Research Staff Exchange Scheme Fellowship (PIRSES-GA-2011-295223). Operations in the Canadian High Arctic were supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), ArcticNet and the Polar Continental Shelf Program (PCSP). We are also grateful to the TOTAL Foundation (Paris) and the UK NERC (WP 4.3 of Oceans 2025 core funding to FCK at the Scottish Association for Marine Science) for funding the expedition to Baffin Island and within this context Olivier Dargent and Dr. Pieter van West for sample collection, and the Spanish Ministry of Science and Technology through project LIMNOPOLAR (POL200606635 and CGL2005-06549-C02-01/ANT to AQ as well as CGL2005-06549-C02-02/ANT to AC, the last of these co-financed by European FEDER funds). We are grateful for funding from the MASTS pooling initiative (The Marine Alliance for Science and Technology for Scotland), funded by the Scottish Funding Council (HR09011) and contributing institutions. Supplementary Material The Supplementary Material for this article can be found online at: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fevo.2017.00137/full#supplementary-material",
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T1 - Pole-to-Pole Connections

T2 - Similarities between Arctic and Antarctic Microbiomes and Their Vulnerability to Environmental Change

AU - Kleinteich, Julia

AU - Hildebrand, Falk

AU - Bahram, Mohammad

AU - Voigt, Anita Y.

AU - Wood, Susanna A.

AU - Jungblut, Anne D.

AU - Küpper, Frithjof C.

AU - Quesada, Antonio

AU - Camacho, Antonio

AU - Pearce, David A.

AU - Convey, Peter

AU - Vincent, Warwick F.

AU - Zarfl, Christiane

AU - Bork, Peer

AU - Dietrich, Daniel R.

N1 - Acknowledgments JK acknowledges the Carl Zeiss foundation for PhD funding, the Marie-Curie COFUND-BEIPD PostDoc fellowship for PostDoc funding, FNRS travel funding and the logistical and financial support by UNIS. JK and FK acknowledge the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Antarctic Funding Initiative AFI-CGS-70 (collaborative gearing scheme) and logistic support from the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) for field work in Antarctica. JK and CZ acknowledge the Excellence Initiative at the University of Tübingen funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research and the German Research Foundation (DFG). FH, AV, and PB received funding from MetaHIT (HEALTH-F4-2007-201052), Microbios (ERC-AdG-502 669830) and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL). We thank members of the Bork group at EMBL for helpful discussions. We acknowledge the EMBL Genomics Core Facility for sequencing support and Y. P. Yuan and the EMBL Information Technology Core Facility for support with high-performance computing and EMBL for financial support. PC is supported by NERC core funding to the BAS “Biodiversity, Evolution and Adaptation” Team. MB was funded by Helge Ax:son Johnsons Stiftelse and PUT1317. DRD acknowledges the DFG funded project DI698/18-1 Dietrich and the Marie Curie International Research Staff Exchange Scheme Fellowship (PIRSES-GA-2011-295223). Operations in the Canadian High Arctic were supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), ArcticNet and the Polar Continental Shelf Program (PCSP). We are also grateful to the TOTAL Foundation (Paris) and the UK NERC (WP 4.3 of Oceans 2025 core funding to FCK at the Scottish Association for Marine Science) for funding the expedition to Baffin Island and within this context Olivier Dargent and Dr. Pieter van West for sample collection, and the Spanish Ministry of Science and Technology through project LIMNOPOLAR (POL200606635 and CGL2005-06549-C02-01/ANT to AQ as well as CGL2005-06549-C02-02/ANT to AC, the last of these co-financed by European FEDER funds). We are grateful for funding from the MASTS pooling initiative (The Marine Alliance for Science and Technology for Scotland), funded by the Scottish Funding Council (HR09011) and contributing institutions. Supplementary Material The Supplementary Material for this article can be found online at: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fevo.2017.00137/full#supplementary-material

PY - 2017/11/10

Y1 - 2017/11/10

N2 - The global biogeography of microorganisms remains poorly resolved, which limits the current understanding of microbial resilience towards environmental changes. Using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, we characterized the microbial diversity of terrestrial and lacustrine biofilms from the Arctic, Antarctic and temperate regions. Our analyses suggest that bacterial community compositions at the poles are more similar to each other than they are to geographically closer temperate habitats, with 32 % of all operational taxonomic units (OTUs) co-occurring in both polar regions. While specific microbial taxa were confined to distinct regions, representing potentially endemic populations, the percentage of cosmopolitan taxa was higher in Arctic (43 %) than in Antarctic samples (36 %). The overlap in polar microbial OTUs may be explained by natural or anthropogenically-mediated dispersal in combination with environmental filtering. Current and future changing environmental conditions may enhance microbial invasion, establishment of cosmopolitan genotypes and loss of endemic taxa.

AB - The global biogeography of microorganisms remains poorly resolved, which limits the current understanding of microbial resilience towards environmental changes. Using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, we characterized the microbial diversity of terrestrial and lacustrine biofilms from the Arctic, Antarctic and temperate regions. Our analyses suggest that bacterial community compositions at the poles are more similar to each other than they are to geographically closer temperate habitats, with 32 % of all operational taxonomic units (OTUs) co-occurring in both polar regions. While specific microbial taxa were confined to distinct regions, representing potentially endemic populations, the percentage of cosmopolitan taxa was higher in Arctic (43 %) than in Antarctic samples (36 %). The overlap in polar microbial OTUs may be explained by natural or anthropogenically-mediated dispersal in combination with environmental filtering. Current and future changing environmental conditions may enhance microbial invasion, establishment of cosmopolitan genotypes and loss of endemic taxa.

KW - biogeography

KW - diversity

KW - microbiology

KW - polar regions

KW - ecology

KW - high-throuput sequencing

KW - 16S rRNA gene

U2 - 10.3389/fevo.2017.00137

DO - 10.3389/fevo.2017.00137

M3 - Article

VL - 5

JO - Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution

JF - Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution

SN - 2296-701X

M1 - 137

ER -