Prediction of seismic-induced structural damage using artificial neural networks

Oliver Richard De Lautour, Piotr Omenzetter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)
5 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Contemporary methods for estimating the extent of seismic-induced damage to structures include the use of nonlinear finite element method (FEM) and seismic vulnerability curves. FEM is applicable when a small number of predetermined structures is to be assessed, but becomes inefficient for larger stocks. Seismic vulnerability curves enable damage estimation for classes of similar structures characterised by a small number of parameters, and typically use only one parameter to describe ground motion. Hence, they are unable to extend damage prognosis to wider classes of structures, e.g. buildings with a different number of storeys and/or bays, or capture the full complexity of the relationship between damage and seismic excitation parameters. Motivated by these shortcomings, this study presents a general method for predicting seismic-induced damage using Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs). The approach was to describe both the structure and ground motion using a large number of structural and ground motion properties. The class of structures analysed were 2D reinforced concrete (RC) frames that varied in topology, stiffness, strength and damping, and were subjected to a suite of ground motions. Dynamic structural responses were simulated using nonlinear FEM analysis and damage indices describing the extent of damage calculated. Using the results of the numerical simulations, a mapping between the structural and ground motion properties and the damage indices was than established using an ANN. The performance of the ANN was assessed using several examples and the ANN was found to be capable of successfully predicting damage.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)600-606
Number of pages7
JournalEngineering Structures
Volume31
Issue number2
Early online date16 Dec 2008
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2009

Fingerprint

Neural networks
Finite element method
Structural dynamics
Reinforced concrete
Damping
Stiffness
Topology
Computer simulation

Keywords

  • damage prediction
  • structural vulnerability
  • seismic damage
  • artificial neural networks

Cite this

Prediction of seismic-induced structural damage using artificial neural networks. / De Lautour, Oliver Richard; Omenzetter, Piotr.

In: Engineering Structures, Vol. 31, No. 2, 02.2009, p. 600-606.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{60d02f488faf4ded88ced60c4b1a2eb8,
title = "Prediction of seismic-induced structural damage using artificial neural networks",
abstract = "Contemporary methods for estimating the extent of seismic-induced damage to structures include the use of nonlinear finite element method (FEM) and seismic vulnerability curves. FEM is applicable when a small number of predetermined structures is to be assessed, but becomes inefficient for larger stocks. Seismic vulnerability curves enable damage estimation for classes of similar structures characterised by a small number of parameters, and typically use only one parameter to describe ground motion. Hence, they are unable to extend damage prognosis to wider classes of structures, e.g. buildings with a different number of storeys and/or bays, or capture the full complexity of the relationship between damage and seismic excitation parameters. Motivated by these shortcomings, this study presents a general method for predicting seismic-induced damage using Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs). The approach was to describe both the structure and ground motion using a large number of structural and ground motion properties. The class of structures analysed were 2D reinforced concrete (RC) frames that varied in topology, stiffness, strength and damping, and were subjected to a suite of ground motions. Dynamic structural responses were simulated using nonlinear FEM analysis and damage indices describing the extent of damage calculated. Using the results of the numerical simulations, a mapping between the structural and ground motion properties and the damage indices was than established using an ANN. The performance of the ANN was assessed using several examples and the ANN was found to be capable of successfully predicting damage.",
keywords = "damage prediction, structural vulnerability, seismic damage, artificial neural networks",
author = "{De Lautour}, {Oliver Richard} and Piotr Omenzetter",
year = "2009",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1016/j.engstruct.2008.11.010",
language = "English",
volume = "31",
pages = "600--606",
journal = "Engineering Structures",
issn = "0141-0296",
publisher = "ELSEVIER APPL SCI PUBL LTD",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prediction of seismic-induced structural damage using artificial neural networks

AU - De Lautour, Oliver Richard

AU - Omenzetter, Piotr

PY - 2009/2

Y1 - 2009/2

N2 - Contemporary methods for estimating the extent of seismic-induced damage to structures include the use of nonlinear finite element method (FEM) and seismic vulnerability curves. FEM is applicable when a small number of predetermined structures is to be assessed, but becomes inefficient for larger stocks. Seismic vulnerability curves enable damage estimation for classes of similar structures characterised by a small number of parameters, and typically use only one parameter to describe ground motion. Hence, they are unable to extend damage prognosis to wider classes of structures, e.g. buildings with a different number of storeys and/or bays, or capture the full complexity of the relationship between damage and seismic excitation parameters. Motivated by these shortcomings, this study presents a general method for predicting seismic-induced damage using Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs). The approach was to describe both the structure and ground motion using a large number of structural and ground motion properties. The class of structures analysed were 2D reinforced concrete (RC) frames that varied in topology, stiffness, strength and damping, and were subjected to a suite of ground motions. Dynamic structural responses were simulated using nonlinear FEM analysis and damage indices describing the extent of damage calculated. Using the results of the numerical simulations, a mapping between the structural and ground motion properties and the damage indices was than established using an ANN. The performance of the ANN was assessed using several examples and the ANN was found to be capable of successfully predicting damage.

AB - Contemporary methods for estimating the extent of seismic-induced damage to structures include the use of nonlinear finite element method (FEM) and seismic vulnerability curves. FEM is applicable when a small number of predetermined structures is to be assessed, but becomes inefficient for larger stocks. Seismic vulnerability curves enable damage estimation for classes of similar structures characterised by a small number of parameters, and typically use only one parameter to describe ground motion. Hence, they are unable to extend damage prognosis to wider classes of structures, e.g. buildings with a different number of storeys and/or bays, or capture the full complexity of the relationship between damage and seismic excitation parameters. Motivated by these shortcomings, this study presents a general method for predicting seismic-induced damage using Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs). The approach was to describe both the structure and ground motion using a large number of structural and ground motion properties. The class of structures analysed were 2D reinforced concrete (RC) frames that varied in topology, stiffness, strength and damping, and were subjected to a suite of ground motions. Dynamic structural responses were simulated using nonlinear FEM analysis and damage indices describing the extent of damage calculated. Using the results of the numerical simulations, a mapping between the structural and ground motion properties and the damage indices was than established using an ANN. The performance of the ANN was assessed using several examples and the ANN was found to be capable of successfully predicting damage.

KW - damage prediction

KW - structural vulnerability

KW - seismic damage

KW - artificial neural networks

U2 - 10.1016/j.engstruct.2008.11.010

DO - 10.1016/j.engstruct.2008.11.010

M3 - Article

VL - 31

SP - 600

EP - 606

JO - Engineering Structures

JF - Engineering Structures

SN - 0141-0296

IS - 2

ER -