Response Detection of Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer to Clinically Utilised and Novel Treatments by Monitoring Phospholipid Metabolism

Tim A D Smith, Su Myat Phyu, Kholoud S Alzyoud, Chih-Chung Tseng

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Abstract

Androgen receptor (AR) activation is the primary driving factor in prostate cancer which is initially responsive to castration but then becomes resistant (castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC)). CRPC cells still retain the functioning AR which can be targeted by other therapies. A recent promising development is the use of inhibitors (Epi-1) of protein-protein interaction to inhibit AR-activated signalling. Translating novel therapies into the clinic requires sensitive early response indicators. Here potential response markers are explored. Growth inhibition of prostate cancer cells with flutamide, paclitaxel, and Epi-1 was measured using the MTT assay. To simulate choline-PET scans, pulse-chase experiments were carried out with -methyl]choline and proportion of phosphorylated activity was determined after treatment with growth inhibitory concentrations of each drug. Extracts from treated cells were also subject to 31P-NMR spectroscopy. Cells treated with flutamide demonstrated decreased -methyl]choline phosphorylation, whilst the proportion of phosphorylated -methyl]choline that was present in the lipid fraction was increased in Epi-1-treated cells. Phospholipid breakdown products, glycerophosphorylcholine and glycerophosphoethanolamine levels, were shown by 31P-NMR spectroscopy to be decreased to undetectable levels in cells treated with Epi-1. LNCaP cells responding to treatment with novel protein-protein interaction inhibitors suggest that 31P-NMR spectroscopy may be useful in detecting response to this promising therapy.
Original languageEnglish
Article number4793465
Number of pages7
JournalBioMed Research International
Volume2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Jun 2017

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Choline
Metabolism
Phospholipids
Prostatic Neoplasms
Androgen Receptors
Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy
Flutamide
Monitoring
Castration
Cells
Proteins
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Glycerylphosphorylcholine
Phosphorylation
Paclitaxel
Assays
Chemical activation
Growth
Cell Extracts
Lipids

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Response Detection of Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer to Clinically Utilised and Novel Treatments by Monitoring Phospholipid Metabolism. / Smith, Tim A D; Phyu, Su Myat; Alzyoud, Kholoud S; Tseng, Chih-Chung.

In: BioMed Research International , Vol. 2017, 4793465, 22.06.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Androgen receptor (AR) activation is the primary driving factor in prostate cancer which is initially responsive to castration but then becomes resistant (castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC)). CRPC cells still retain the functioning AR which can be targeted by other therapies. A recent promising development is the use of inhibitors (Epi-1) of protein-protein interaction to inhibit AR-activated signalling. Translating novel therapies into the clinic requires sensitive early response indicators. Here potential response markers are explored. Growth inhibition of prostate cancer cells with flutamide, paclitaxel, and Epi-1 was measured using the MTT assay. To simulate choline-PET scans, pulse-chase experiments were carried out with -methyl]choline and proportion of phosphorylated activity was determined after treatment with growth inhibitory concentrations of each drug. Extracts from treated cells were also subject to 31P-NMR spectroscopy. Cells treated with flutamide demonstrated decreased -methyl]choline phosphorylation, whilst the proportion of phosphorylated -methyl]choline that was present in the lipid fraction was increased in Epi-1-treated cells. Phospholipid breakdown products, glycerophosphorylcholine and glycerophosphoethanolamine levels, were shown by 31P-NMR spectroscopy to be decreased to undetectable levels in cells treated with Epi-1. LNCaP cells responding to treatment with novel protein-protein interaction inhibitors suggest that 31P-NMR spectroscopy may be useful in detecting response to this promising therapy.",
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