Rhizosphere-Scale Quantification of Hydraulic and Mechanical Properties of Soil Impacted by Root and Seed Exudates

Muhammad Naveed, L .K. Brown, Annette Catriona Raffan, Timothy S. George, A. G. Bengough, Tiina Roose, I. Sinclair, N. Koebernik, L. Cooper, Paul David Hallett

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Abstract

Using rhizosphere-scale physical measurements, we tested the hypothesis that plant exudates gel together soil particles and, on drying, enhance soil water repellency. Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Optic) and maize (Zea mays L. cv. Freya) root exudates were compared with chia seed exudate, a commonly used root exudate analog. Sandy loam and clay loam soils were treated with root exudates at 0.46 and 4.6 mg exudate g−1 dry soil and chia seed exudate at 0.046, 0.46, 0.92, 2.3 and 4.6 mg exudate g−1 dry soil. Soil hardness and modulus of elasticity were measured at −10 kPa matric potential using a 3-mm-diameter spherical indenter. The water sorptivity and repellency index of air-dry soil were measured using a miniaturized infiltrometer device with a 1-mm tip radius. Soil hardness increased by 28% for barley root exudate, 62% for maize root exudate, and 86% for chia seed exudate at 4.6 mg g−1 concentration in the sandy loam soil. For the clay loam soil, root exudates did not affect soil hardness, whereas chia seed exudate increased soil hardness by 48% at 4.6 mg g−1 concentration. Soil water repellency increased by 48% for chia seed exudate and 23% for maize root exudate but not for barley root exudate at 4.6 mg g−1 concentration in the sandy loam soil. For the clay loam soil, chia seed exudate increased water repellency by 45%, whereas root exudates did not affect water repellency at 4.6 mg g−1 concentration. Water sorptivity and repellency were both correlated with hardness, presumably due to the combined influence of exudates on the hydrological and mechanical properties of the soils.
Original languageEnglish
Article number170083
JournalVadose zone journal
Volume17
Issue number1
Early online date15 Feb 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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soil mechanical properties
root exudates
hydraulic property
rhizosphere
mechanical property
fluid mechanics
seed
seeds
hardness
soil
clay loam soils
clay loam
sandy loam
barley
sandy loam soils
corn
maize
water
plant exudates
soil water

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Rhizosphere-Scale Quantification of Hydraulic and Mechanical Properties of Soil Impacted by Root and Seed Exudates. / Naveed, Muhammad; Brown, L .K.; Raffan, Annette Catriona; George, Timothy S.; Bengough, A. G.; Roose, Tiina; Sinclair, I.; Koebernik, N.; Cooper, L.; Hallett, Paul David.

In: Vadose zone journal, Vol. 17, No. 1, 170083, 2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Naveed, M, Brown, LK, Raffan, AC, George, TS, Bengough, AG, Roose, T, Sinclair, I, Koebernik, N, Cooper, L & Hallett, PD 2018, 'Rhizosphere-Scale Quantification of Hydraulic and Mechanical Properties of Soil Impacted by Root and Seed Exudates', Vadose zone journal, vol. 17, no. 1, 170083. https://doi.org/10.2136/vzj2017.04.0083
Naveed, Muhammad ; Brown, L .K. ; Raffan, Annette Catriona ; George, Timothy S. ; Bengough, A. G. ; Roose, Tiina ; Sinclair, I. ; Koebernik, N. ; Cooper, L. ; Hallett, Paul David. / Rhizosphere-Scale Quantification of Hydraulic and Mechanical Properties of Soil Impacted by Root and Seed Exudates. In: Vadose zone journal. 2018 ; Vol. 17, No. 1.
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title = "Rhizosphere-Scale Quantification of Hydraulic and Mechanical Properties of Soil Impacted by Root and Seed Exudates",
abstract = "Using rhizosphere-scale physical measurements, we tested the hypothesis that plant exudates gel together soil particles and, on drying, enhance soil water repellency. Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Optic) and maize (Zea mays L. cv. Freya) root exudates were compared with chia seed exudate, a commonly used root exudate analog. Sandy loam and clay loam soils were treated with root exudates at 0.46 and 4.6 mg exudate g−1 dry soil and chia seed exudate at 0.046, 0.46, 0.92, 2.3 and 4.6 mg exudate g−1 dry soil. Soil hardness and modulus of elasticity were measured at −10 kPa matric potential using a 3-mm-diameter spherical indenter. The water sorptivity and repellency index of air-dry soil were measured using a miniaturized infiltrometer device with a 1-mm tip radius. Soil hardness increased by 28{\%} for barley root exudate, 62{\%} for maize root exudate, and 86{\%} for chia seed exudate at 4.6 mg g−1 concentration in the sandy loam soil. For the clay loam soil, root exudates did not affect soil hardness, whereas chia seed exudate increased soil hardness by 48{\%} at 4.6 mg g−1 concentration. Soil water repellency increased by 48{\%} for chia seed exudate and 23{\%} for maize root exudate but not for barley root exudate at 4.6 mg g−1 concentration in the sandy loam soil. For the clay loam soil, chia seed exudate increased water repellency by 45{\%}, whereas root exudates did not affect water repellency at 4.6 mg g−1 concentration. Water sorptivity and repellency were both correlated with hardness, presumably due to the combined influence of exudates on the hydrological and mechanical properties of the soils.",
author = "Muhammad Naveed and Brown, {L .K.} and Raffan, {Annette Catriona} and George, {Timothy S.} and Bengough, {A. G.} and Tiina Roose and I. Sinclair and N. Koebernik and L. Cooper and Hallett, {Paul David}",
note = "We thank George Themistocleus, who conducted preliminary research on the indentation technique as part of his M.S. project. This work was funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) project “Rhizosphere by Design” (BB/L026058/1, BB/J000868/1, and BB/J011460/1) with support from a Royal Society University Research Fellowship, EPSRC EP/M020355/1 and ERC Consolidator Grant DIMR 646809. The James Hutton Institute receives funding from the Scottish Government.",
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doi = "10.2136/vzj2017.04.0083",
language = "English",
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issn = "1539-1663",
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AU - Naveed, Muhammad

AU - Brown, L .K.

AU - Raffan, Annette Catriona

AU - George, Timothy S.

AU - Bengough, A. G.

AU - Roose, Tiina

AU - Sinclair, I.

AU - Koebernik, N.

AU - Cooper, L.

AU - Hallett, Paul David

N1 - We thank George Themistocleus, who conducted preliminary research on the indentation technique as part of his M.S. project. This work was funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) project “Rhizosphere by Design” (BB/L026058/1, BB/J000868/1, and BB/J011460/1) with support from a Royal Society University Research Fellowship, EPSRC EP/M020355/1 and ERC Consolidator Grant DIMR 646809. The James Hutton Institute receives funding from the Scottish Government.

PY - 2018

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N2 - Using rhizosphere-scale physical measurements, we tested the hypothesis that plant exudates gel together soil particles and, on drying, enhance soil water repellency. Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Optic) and maize (Zea mays L. cv. Freya) root exudates were compared with chia seed exudate, a commonly used root exudate analog. Sandy loam and clay loam soils were treated with root exudates at 0.46 and 4.6 mg exudate g−1 dry soil and chia seed exudate at 0.046, 0.46, 0.92, 2.3 and 4.6 mg exudate g−1 dry soil. Soil hardness and modulus of elasticity were measured at −10 kPa matric potential using a 3-mm-diameter spherical indenter. The water sorptivity and repellency index of air-dry soil were measured using a miniaturized infiltrometer device with a 1-mm tip radius. Soil hardness increased by 28% for barley root exudate, 62% for maize root exudate, and 86% for chia seed exudate at 4.6 mg g−1 concentration in the sandy loam soil. For the clay loam soil, root exudates did not affect soil hardness, whereas chia seed exudate increased soil hardness by 48% at 4.6 mg g−1 concentration. Soil water repellency increased by 48% for chia seed exudate and 23% for maize root exudate but not for barley root exudate at 4.6 mg g−1 concentration in the sandy loam soil. For the clay loam soil, chia seed exudate increased water repellency by 45%, whereas root exudates did not affect water repellency at 4.6 mg g−1 concentration. Water sorptivity and repellency were both correlated with hardness, presumably due to the combined influence of exudates on the hydrological and mechanical properties of the soils.

AB - Using rhizosphere-scale physical measurements, we tested the hypothesis that plant exudates gel together soil particles and, on drying, enhance soil water repellency. Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Optic) and maize (Zea mays L. cv. Freya) root exudates were compared with chia seed exudate, a commonly used root exudate analog. Sandy loam and clay loam soils were treated with root exudates at 0.46 and 4.6 mg exudate g−1 dry soil and chia seed exudate at 0.046, 0.46, 0.92, 2.3 and 4.6 mg exudate g−1 dry soil. Soil hardness and modulus of elasticity were measured at −10 kPa matric potential using a 3-mm-diameter spherical indenter. The water sorptivity and repellency index of air-dry soil were measured using a miniaturized infiltrometer device with a 1-mm tip radius. Soil hardness increased by 28% for barley root exudate, 62% for maize root exudate, and 86% for chia seed exudate at 4.6 mg g−1 concentration in the sandy loam soil. For the clay loam soil, root exudates did not affect soil hardness, whereas chia seed exudate increased soil hardness by 48% at 4.6 mg g−1 concentration. Soil water repellency increased by 48% for chia seed exudate and 23% for maize root exudate but not for barley root exudate at 4.6 mg g−1 concentration in the sandy loam soil. For the clay loam soil, chia seed exudate increased water repellency by 45%, whereas root exudates did not affect water repellency at 4.6 mg g−1 concentration. Water sorptivity and repellency were both correlated with hardness, presumably due to the combined influence of exudates on the hydrological and mechanical properties of the soils.

U2 - 10.2136/vzj2017.04.0083

DO - 10.2136/vzj2017.04.0083

M3 - Article

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JO - Vadose zone journal

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SN - 1539-1663

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