Robotic colorectal surgery

summary of the current evidence

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    45 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have confirmed that laparoscopic colorectal surgery results in improved early post-operative outcomes. Nevertheless, conventional laparoscopic approach and instruments have several limitations. Robotic approach could potentially address of many of these limitations.

    OBJECTIVES: This review aims to present a summary of the current evidence on the role of robotic colorectal surgery.

    METHODS: A comprehensive search of electronic databases (Pubmed, Science Direct and Google scholar) using the key words "rectal surgery", "laparoscopic", "colonic" and "robotic." Evidence from these data was critically analysed and summarised to produce this article.

    RESULTS: Robotic colorectal surgery is both safe and feasible. However, it has no clear advantages over standard laparoscopic colorectal surgery in terms of early postoperative outcomes or complications profile. It has shorter learning curve but increased operative time and cost. It could offer potential advantage in resection of rectal cancer as it has a lower conversion rates even in obese individuals, distal rectal tumours and patients who had preoperative chemoradiotherpy. There is also a trend towards better outcome in anastomotic leak rates, circumferential margin positivity and perseveration of autonomic function, but there was no clear statistical significance to support this from the currently available data.

    CONCLUSION: The use of robotic approach seems to be capable of addressing most of the shortcomings of the standard laparoscopic surgery. The technique has proved its safety profile in both colonic and rectal surgery. However, the cost involved may restrict its use to patients with challenging rectal cancer and in specialist centres.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1-8
    Number of pages8
    JournalInternational Journal of Colorectal Disease
    Volume29
    Issue number1
    Early online date1 Sep 2013
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 2014

    Fingerprint

    Colorectal Surgery
    Robotics
    Laparoscopy
    Rectal Neoplasms
    Costs and Cost Analysis
    Anastomotic Leak
    Learning Curve
    Operative Time
    PubMed
    Databases
    Safety

    Keywords

    • Clinical Trials as Topic
    • Colorectal Surgery
    • Humans
    • Learning Curve
    • Organ Sparing Treatments
    • Robotics
    • Treatment Outcome
    • Journal Article
    • Meta-Analysis
    • Review

    Cite this

    Robotic colorectal surgery : summary of the current evidence. / Aly, E H.

    In: International Journal of Colorectal Disease, Vol. 29, No. 1, 01.2014, p. 1-8.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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