'Sensuous Singularity'

Hamish Fulton's Cairngorm Walk-Texts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The purpose of this article is to consider walking artist Hamish Fulton’s ‘walk-texts’ as ethical responses to the environment. In light of the environmental crisis that manifests in the proposed stratigraphic designation ‘Anthropocene’, Jane Bennett’s writing on enchantment offers a direction for thinking about how an ecologically ethical sensibility might be cultivated. Fulton’s communicative response to his walking art, I argue, embodies the discernment of ‘things in their sensuous singularity’ that Bennett identifies as a key attribute of enchantment. Yet, in his own writing on his art practice, the walk-texts are conceived as secondary – a necessary counterpart to walking as an experiential activity. By honing in on two recurring strategies we find in Fulton’s Cairngorm walk-texts – the list and the return – I argue that his work offers a linguistic mode that holds great potential for tuning us to environmental ethics in the Anthropocene.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)12-32
Number of pages21
JournalCritical Survey
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2017

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Singularity
Hamish Fulton
Art
Enchantment
Environmental Ethics
Artist
Discernment
Tuning
Sensibility
Environmental Crisis
Designation

Keywords

  • anthropocene
  • ecology
  • ethics
  • Hamish Fulton
  • Jane Bennett
  • sensuous singularity

Cite this

'Sensuous Singularity' : Hamish Fulton's Cairngorm Walk-Texts. / Macpherson, Alan .

In: Critical Survey, Vol. 29, No. 1, 01.03.2017, p. 12-32.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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