Spectroscopic Methods for Investigating Reaction Pathways

Russell F. Howe*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter reviews the use of infrared spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to investigate reaction pathways in photocatalysis. In the case of infrared spectroscopy, examples are given from four different experimental methods for obtaining spectra of photocatalysts and adsorbed species: transmission, diffuse reflectance IR Fourier transform (DRIFT), attenuated total reflectance (ATR) and reflection–absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS),which is applicable to single-crystal surfaces. EPR spectroscopy has been employed to observe trapped charge species (electrons and holes) and radical intermediates produced by reaction of electrons or holes with adsorbed species. Examples of both are given.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEnvironmental Photochemistry
Subtitle of host publicationPart III
EditorsDetlef W. Bahnemann, Peter K. J. Robertson
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages267-300
Number of pages34
ISBN (Print)978-3-662-46794-7, 978-3-662-46795-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2015

Publication series

NameHandbook of Environmental Chemistry
Volume35
ISSN (Print)1867-979X

Fingerprint

infrared spectroscopy
Infrared spectroscopy
electron spin resonance
Paramagnetic resonance
reflectance
spectroscopy
Spectroscopy
Single crystal surfaces
electron
Electrons
Photocatalysis
Photocatalysts
Fourier transform
Fourier transforms
crystal
method

Keywords

  • ATR
  • DRIFT
  • EPR spectroscopy
  • Radical intermediates
  • RAIRS
  • Transmission FTIR
  • Trapped electrons
  • Trapped holes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Global and Planetary Change
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Pollution

Cite this

Howe, R. F. (2015). Spectroscopic Methods for Investigating Reaction Pathways. In D. W. Bahnemann, & P. K. J. Robertson (Eds.), Environmental Photochemistry: Part III (pp. 267-300). (Handbook of Environmental Chemistry; Vol. 35). Springer Verlag. https://doi.org/10.1007/698_2014_255

Spectroscopic Methods for Investigating Reaction Pathways. / Howe, Russell F.

Environmental Photochemistry: Part III. ed. / Detlef W. Bahnemann; Peter K. J. Robertson. Springer Verlag, 2015. p. 267-300 (Handbook of Environmental Chemistry; Vol. 35).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Howe, RF 2015, Spectroscopic Methods for Investigating Reaction Pathways. in DW Bahnemann & PKJ Robertson (eds), Environmental Photochemistry: Part III. Handbook of Environmental Chemistry, vol. 35, Springer Verlag, pp. 267-300. https://doi.org/10.1007/698_2014_255
Howe RF. Spectroscopic Methods for Investigating Reaction Pathways. In Bahnemann DW, Robertson PKJ, editors, Environmental Photochemistry: Part III. Springer Verlag. 2015. p. 267-300. (Handbook of Environmental Chemistry). https://doi.org/10.1007/698_2014_255
Howe, Russell F. / Spectroscopic Methods for Investigating Reaction Pathways. Environmental Photochemistry: Part III. editor / Detlef W. Bahnemann ; Peter K. J. Robertson. Springer Verlag, 2015. pp. 267-300 (Handbook of Environmental Chemistry).
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