Sugar and fat intake among children in Scotland

what is needed to reach the dietary targets?

Geraldine McNeill, Lindsey F Masson, Leone CA Craig, Jennie I Macdiarmid, Bridget A Holmes, Michael Nelson, Christine Sheehy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To assess the intake and sources of non-milk extrinsic sugars (NMES) and fat among children in Scotland in relation to socio-economic status, and to estimate the changes in diet required to achieve recommended levels of intake. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey with diet assessed by semi-quantitative FFQ. SETTING: Eighty postcode sectors across Scotland. SUBJECTS: Children (n 1398) aged 3-17 years recruited from the Child Benefit register (76 % of those contacted). RESULTS: The mean intake of NMES of 17.4 (95 % CI 17.0, 17.8) % food energy was considerably higher than the UK recommended population average of 11 % food energy. The mean intake of total fat of 32.9 (95 % CI 32.7, 33.2) % food energy met the recommended population average of no more than 35 % food energy, while the mean intake of SFA of 13.8 (95 % CI 13.7, 14.0) % food energy was above the recommended population average of no more than 11 % food energy. Despite clear socio-economic gradients in the mean daily consumption of many 'healthy' and 'unhealthy' food groups, socio-economic differences in NMES as a percentage of food energy were limited and there was no significant variation in the intake of total fat or SFA as a percentage of food energy with socio-economic status. Modelling of the data showed that removing sugar-sweetened soft drinks and increasing fruit and vegetable intake by 50 % would not restore the intake of NMES and SFA to recommended levels. CONCLUSIONS: Major changes in the intake of many food groups will be required to bring the NMES and saturated fat intake in line with current dietary recommendations.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1286–1294
Number of pages9
JournalPublic Health Nutrition
Volume13
Issue number8
Early online date8 Dec 2009
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2010

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Scotland
Fats
Food
Economics
Population
Diet
Carbonated Beverages
Vegetables
Fruit
Cross-Sectional Studies
Eating

Keywords

  • sugar
  • fat
  • intake
  • children
  • Scotland

Cite this

Sugar and fat intake among children in Scotland : what is needed to reach the dietary targets? / McNeill, Geraldine; Masson, Lindsey F; Craig, Leone CA; Macdiarmid, Jennie I; Holmes, Bridget A; Nelson, Michael; Sheehy, Christine.

In: Public Health Nutrition, Vol. 13, No. 8, 08.2010, p. 1286–1294.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McNeill, Geraldine ; Masson, Lindsey F ; Craig, Leone CA ; Macdiarmid, Jennie I ; Holmes, Bridget A ; Nelson, Michael ; Sheehy, Christine. / Sugar and fat intake among children in Scotland : what is needed to reach the dietary targets?. In: Public Health Nutrition. 2010 ; Vol. 13, No. 8. pp. 1286–1294.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To assess the intake and sources of non-milk extrinsic sugars (NMES) and fat among children in Scotland in relation to socio-economic status, and to estimate the changes in diet required to achieve recommended levels of intake. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey with diet assessed by semi-quantitative FFQ. SETTING: Eighty postcode sectors across Scotland. SUBJECTS: Children (n 1398) aged 3-17 years recruited from the Child Benefit register (76 {\%} of those contacted). RESULTS: The mean intake of NMES of 17.4 (95 {\%} CI 17.0, 17.8) {\%} food energy was considerably higher than the UK recommended population average of 11 {\%} food energy. The mean intake of total fat of 32.9 (95 {\%} CI 32.7, 33.2) {\%} food energy met the recommended population average of no more than 35 {\%} food energy, while the mean intake of SFA of 13.8 (95 {\%} CI 13.7, 14.0) {\%} food energy was above the recommended population average of no more than 11 {\%} food energy. Despite clear socio-economic gradients in the mean daily consumption of many 'healthy' and 'unhealthy' food groups, socio-economic differences in NMES as a percentage of food energy were limited and there was no significant variation in the intake of total fat or SFA as a percentage of food energy with socio-economic status. Modelling of the data showed that removing sugar-sweetened soft drinks and increasing fruit and vegetable intake by 50 {\%} would not restore the intake of NMES and SFA to recommended levels. CONCLUSIONS: Major changes in the intake of many food groups will be required to bring the NMES and saturated fat intake in line with current dietary recommendations.",
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AU - McNeill, Geraldine

AU - Masson, Lindsey F

AU - Craig, Leone CA

AU - Macdiarmid, Jennie I

AU - Holmes, Bridget A

AU - Nelson, Michael

AU - Sheehy, Christine

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N2 - OBJECTIVE: To assess the intake and sources of non-milk extrinsic sugars (NMES) and fat among children in Scotland in relation to socio-economic status, and to estimate the changes in diet required to achieve recommended levels of intake. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey with diet assessed by semi-quantitative FFQ. SETTING: Eighty postcode sectors across Scotland. SUBJECTS: Children (n 1398) aged 3-17 years recruited from the Child Benefit register (76 % of those contacted). RESULTS: The mean intake of NMES of 17.4 (95 % CI 17.0, 17.8) % food energy was considerably higher than the UK recommended population average of 11 % food energy. The mean intake of total fat of 32.9 (95 % CI 32.7, 33.2) % food energy met the recommended population average of no more than 35 % food energy, while the mean intake of SFA of 13.8 (95 % CI 13.7, 14.0) % food energy was above the recommended population average of no more than 11 % food energy. Despite clear socio-economic gradients in the mean daily consumption of many 'healthy' and 'unhealthy' food groups, socio-economic differences in NMES as a percentage of food energy were limited and there was no significant variation in the intake of total fat or SFA as a percentage of food energy with socio-economic status. Modelling of the data showed that removing sugar-sweetened soft drinks and increasing fruit and vegetable intake by 50 % would not restore the intake of NMES and SFA to recommended levels. CONCLUSIONS: Major changes in the intake of many food groups will be required to bring the NMES and saturated fat intake in line with current dietary recommendations.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To assess the intake and sources of non-milk extrinsic sugars (NMES) and fat among children in Scotland in relation to socio-economic status, and to estimate the changes in diet required to achieve recommended levels of intake. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey with diet assessed by semi-quantitative FFQ. SETTING: Eighty postcode sectors across Scotland. SUBJECTS: Children (n 1398) aged 3-17 years recruited from the Child Benefit register (76 % of those contacted). RESULTS: The mean intake of NMES of 17.4 (95 % CI 17.0, 17.8) % food energy was considerably higher than the UK recommended population average of 11 % food energy. The mean intake of total fat of 32.9 (95 % CI 32.7, 33.2) % food energy met the recommended population average of no more than 35 % food energy, while the mean intake of SFA of 13.8 (95 % CI 13.7, 14.0) % food energy was above the recommended population average of no more than 11 % food energy. Despite clear socio-economic gradients in the mean daily consumption of many 'healthy' and 'unhealthy' food groups, socio-economic differences in NMES as a percentage of food energy were limited and there was no significant variation in the intake of total fat or SFA as a percentage of food energy with socio-economic status. Modelling of the data showed that removing sugar-sweetened soft drinks and increasing fruit and vegetable intake by 50 % would not restore the intake of NMES and SFA to recommended levels. CONCLUSIONS: Major changes in the intake of many food groups will be required to bring the NMES and saturated fat intake in line with current dietary recommendations.

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