That's enough about ethnography

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

147 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ethnography has become a term so overused, both in anthropology and in contingent disciplines, that it has lost much of its meaning. I argue that to attribute “ethnographicness” to encounters with those among whom we carry on our research, or more generally to fieldwork, is to undermine both the ontological commitment and the educational purpose of anthropology as a discipline, and of its principal way of working—namely participant observation. It is also to reproduce a pernicious distinction between those with whom we study and learn, respectively within and beyond the academy. Anthropology’s obsession with ethnography, more than anything else, is curtailing its public voice. The way to regain it is through reasserting the value of anthropology as a forward-moving discipline dedicated to healing the rupture between imagination and real life.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)383-395
Number of pages13
JournalHau: Journal of Ethnographic Theory
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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ethnography
anthropology
participant observation
academy
commitment
Values
imagination

Keywords

  • correspondence
  • education
  • ethnography
  • fieldwork
  • method
  • participant observation
  • theory

Cite this

That's enough about ethnography. / Ingold, Tim.

In: Hau: Journal of Ethnographic Theory, Vol. 4, No. 1, 2014, p. 383-395.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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