The Behavior Change Technique Taxonomy (v1) of 93 Hierarchically Clustered Techniques: Building an International Consensus for the Reporting of Behavior Change Interventions

Susan Michie, Michelle Richardson, Marie Johnston, Charles Abraham, Jill Francis, Wendy Hardeman, Martin P Eccles, James Cane, Caroline E Wood

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Abstract

BACKGROUND : CONSORT guidelines call for precise reporting of behavior change interventions: we need rigorous methods of characterizing active content of interventions with precision and specificity. OBJECTIVES : The objective of this study is to develop an extensive, consensually agreed hierarchically structured taxonomy of techniques [behavior change techniques (BCTs)] used in behavior change interventions. METHODS : In a Delphi-type exercise, 14 experts rated labels and definitions of 124 BCTs from six published classification systems. Another 18 experts grouped BCTs according to similarity of active ingredients in an open-sort task. Inter-rater agreement amongst six researchers coding 85 intervention descriptions by BCTs was assessed. RESULTS : This resulted in 93 BCTs clustered into 16 groups. Of the 26 BCTs occurring at least five times, 23 had adjusted kappas of 0.60 or above. CONCLUSIONS : "BCT taxonomy v1," an extensive taxonomy of 93 consensually agreed, distinct BCTs, offers a step change as a method for specifying interventions, but we anticipate further development and evaluation based on international, interdisciplinary consensus.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)81-95
Number of pages15
JournalAnnals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume46
Issue number1
Early online date20 Mar 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2013

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Keywords

  • behavior change techniques
  • taxonomy
  • behavior change interventions

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The Behavior Change Technique Taxonomy (v1) of 93 Hierarchically Clustered Techniques : Building an International Consensus for the Reporting of Behavior Change Interventions. / Michie, Susan; Richardson, Michelle; Johnston, Marie; Abraham, Charles; Francis, Jill; Hardeman, Wendy; Eccles, Martin P; Cane, James; Wood, Caroline E.

In: Annals of Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 46, No. 1, 08.2013, p. 81-95.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Michie, Susan ; Richardson, Michelle ; Johnston, Marie ; Abraham, Charles ; Francis, Jill ; Hardeman, Wendy ; Eccles, Martin P ; Cane, James ; Wood, Caroline E. / The Behavior Change Technique Taxonomy (v1) of 93 Hierarchically Clustered Techniques : Building an International Consensus for the Reporting of Behavior Change Interventions. In: Annals of Behavioral Medicine. 2013 ; Vol. 46, No. 1. pp. 81-95.
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