The gender wage gap in Australia - The path of future convergence

Michael Kidd, M. Shannon

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The paper attempts to project the future trend of the gender wage gap in Australia up to 2031. The empirical analysis utilises the Income Distribution Survey (1996) together with Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) demographic projections. The methodology combines the ABS projections with assumptions relating to the evolution of educational attainment in order to project the future distribution of human capital skills and consequently the future size of the gender wage gap. The analysis suggests that female relative pay will continue to rise up to 2031. However, gender wage convergence will be relatively slow, with a substantial gap remaining in 2031.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)161-174
    Number of pages13
    JournalThe Economic Record
    Volume78
    Issue number241
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2002

    Keywords

    • LABOR-MARKET
    • 1980S
    • DISCRIMINATION

    Cite this

    The gender wage gap in Australia - The path of future convergence. / Kidd, Michael; Shannon, M.

    In: The Economic Record, Vol. 78, No. 241, 2002, p. 161-174.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Kidd, Michael ; Shannon, M. / The gender wage gap in Australia - The path of future convergence. In: The Economic Record. 2002 ; Vol. 78, No. 241. pp. 161-174.
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