The large-scale removal of mammalian invasive alien species in Northern Europe

Peter A. Robertson*, Tim Adriaens, Xavier Lambin, Aileen Mill, Sugoto Roy, Craig M. Shuttleworth, Mike Sutton-Croft

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

18 Citations (Scopus)
5 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Numerous examples exist of successful mammalian invasive alien species (IAS) eradications from small islands (<10 km2), but few from more extensive areas. We review 15 large-scale removals (mean area 2627 km2) from Northern Europe since 1900, including edible dormouse, muskrat, coypu, Himalayan porcupine, Pallas' and grey squirrels and American mink, each primarily based on daily checking of static traps. Objectives included true eradication or complete removal to a buffer zone, as distinct from other programmes that involved local control to limit damage or spread. Twelve eradication/removal programmes (80%) were successful. Cost increased with and was best predicted by area, while the cost per unit area decreased; the number of individual animals removed did not add significantly to the model. Doubling the area controlled reduced cost per unit area by 10%, but there was no evidence that cost effectiveness had increased through time. Compared with small islands, larger-scale programmes followed similar patterns of effort in relation to area. However, they brought challenges when defining boundaries and consequent uncertainties around costs, the definition of their objectives, confirmation of success and different considerations for managing recolonisation. Novel technologies or increased use of volunteers may reduce costs. Rapid response to new incursions is recommended as best practice rather than large-scale control to reduce the environmental, financial and welfare costs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)273-279
Number of pages7
JournalPest Management Science
Volume73
Issue number2
Early online date9 Feb 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2017

Fingerprint

Northern European region
invasive species
Gliridae
community programs
Sciurus carolinensis
Myocastor coypus
Ondatra zibethicus
Neovison vison
cost effectiveness
volunteers
uncertainty
buffers
traps
animals

Keywords

  • alien species
  • control
  • eradication
  • invasive species
  • mammal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Insect Science

Cite this

Robertson, P. A., Adriaens, T., Lambin, X., Mill, A., Roy, S., Shuttleworth, C. M., & Sutton-Croft, M. (2017). The large-scale removal of mammalian invasive alien species in Northern Europe. Pest Management Science, 73(2), 273-279. https://doi.org/10.1002/ps.4224

The large-scale removal of mammalian invasive alien species in Northern Europe. / Robertson, Peter A.; Adriaens, Tim; Lambin, Xavier; Mill, Aileen; Roy, Sugoto; Shuttleworth, Craig M.; Sutton-Croft, Mike.

In: Pest Management Science, Vol. 73, No. 2, 01.02.2017, p. 273-279.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Robertson, PA, Adriaens, T, Lambin, X, Mill, A, Roy, S, Shuttleworth, CM & Sutton-Croft, M 2017, 'The large-scale removal of mammalian invasive alien species in Northern Europe', Pest Management Science, vol. 73, no. 2, pp. 273-279. https://doi.org/10.1002/ps.4224
Robertson, Peter A. ; Adriaens, Tim ; Lambin, Xavier ; Mill, Aileen ; Roy, Sugoto ; Shuttleworth, Craig M. ; Sutton-Croft, Mike. / The large-scale removal of mammalian invasive alien species in Northern Europe. In: Pest Management Science. 2017 ; Vol. 73, No. 2. pp. 273-279.
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