The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio

A narrative review

S.S. Faria, P.C. Fernandes, M.J.B. Silva, V.C. Lima, W. Fontes, R. Freitas, A.K. Eterovic, P. Forget (Corresponding Author)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cellular-mediated inflammatory response, lymphocytes, neutrophils, and monocytes are increasingly being recognised as having an important role in tumorigenesis and carcinogenesis. In this context, studies have suggested that the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) can be used as an independent prognostic factor in a variety of cancers. Particularly in breast cancer, several studies have shown that a high NLR is associated with shorter survival. Because the NLR can be easily determined from the full blood count, it could potentially provide a simple and inexpensive test cancer prognosis. This review addresses the possibilities and limitations of using the NLR as a clinical tool for risk stratification helpful for individual treatment of breast cancer patients. The potential underlying phenomena and some perspectives are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Article number702
Journalecancermedicalscience
Volume10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 Dec 2016

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Neutrophils
Lymphocytes
Carcinogenesis
Breast Neoplasms
Monocytes
Neoplasms
Survival
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • breast cancer
  • inflammation
  • neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio
  • prognosis

Cite this

Faria, S. S., Fernandes, P. C., Silva, M. J. B., Lima, V. C., Fontes, W., Freitas, R., ... Forget, P. (2016). The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio: A narrative review. ecancermedicalscience, 10, [702]. https://doi.org/10.3332/ecancer.2016.702

The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio : A narrative review. / Faria, S.S.; Fernandes, P.C.; Silva, M.J.B.; Lima, V.C.; Fontes, W.; Freitas, R.; Eterovic, A.K.; Forget, P. (Corresponding Author).

In: ecancermedicalscience, Vol. 10, 702, 12.12.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Faria, SS, Fernandes, PC, Silva, MJB, Lima, VC, Fontes, W, Freitas, R, Eterovic, AK & Forget, P 2016, 'The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio: A narrative review', ecancermedicalscience, vol. 10, 702. https://doi.org/10.3332/ecancer.2016.702
Faria SS, Fernandes PC, Silva MJB, Lima VC, Fontes W, Freitas R et al. The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio: A narrative review. ecancermedicalscience. 2016 Dec 12;10. 702. https://doi.org/10.3332/ecancer.2016.702
Faria, S.S. ; Fernandes, P.C. ; Silva, M.J.B. ; Lima, V.C. ; Fontes, W. ; Freitas, R. ; Eterovic, A.K. ; Forget, P. / The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio : A narrative review. In: ecancermedicalscience. 2016 ; Vol. 10.
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