The Rhythm of Risk: Sexual Behaviour, PrEP Use and HIV Risk Perception Between 1999 and 2018 Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Maartje Basten*, Chantal den Daas, Janneke C.M. Heijne, Anders Boyd, Udi Davidovich, Ganna Rozhnova, Mirjam Kretzschmar, Amy Matser

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

HIV risk perception plays a crucial role in the uptake of preventive strategies. We investigated how risk perception and its determinants changed between 1999 and 2018 in an open, prospective cohort of 1323 HIV-negative men who have sex with men (MSM). Risk perception, defined as the perceived likelihood of acquiring HIV in the past 6 months, changed over time: being relatively lower in 2008–2011, higher in 2012–2016, and again lower in 2017–2018. Irrespective of calendar year, condomless anal intercourse (AI) with casual partners and high numbers of partners were associated with higher risk perception. In 2017–2018, condomless receptive AI with a partner living with HIV was no longer associated with risk perception, while PrEP use and condomless AI with a steady partner were associated with lower risk perception. We showed that risk perception has fluctuated among MSM in the past 20 years. The Undetectable equals Untransmittable statement and PrEP coincided with lower perceived risk.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1800-1809
Number of pages10
JournalAIDS and Behavior
Volume25
Early online date2 Dec 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2021

Keywords

  • Cohort studies
  • HIV risk perception
  • Men who have sex with men
  • Pre-exposure prophylaxis
  • Sexual behaviour
  • Sexually transmitted diseases

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