The ring test

A quantitative method for assessing the `cataleptic' effect of cannabis in Mice

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

A bioassay for cannabis, called the ring test, has been developed in which the percentage of the total time spent on a horizontal wire ring during which a mouse remains completely immobile is recorded.2. The effect of cannabis on mobility is a dose-related, graded response.3. Threshold doses of cannabis extract are 12·5 mg/kg when injected intravenously, and 100 mg/kg when injected intraperitoneally or subcutaneously.4. The method provides a measure of the `cataleptic' effect of cannabis. Chlorpromazine in doses of 1 mg/kg upwards also produces the effect but barbitone does not.5. It is concluded that ¿1-tetrahydrocannabinol (¿1-THC) is largely responsible for the effect of cannabis extract on mobility; the potency ratio of ¿1-THC to cannabis extract is between 10 and 20. ¿1-Tetrahydrocannabidivarol (¿1-THD) also affects mobility but is less active than ¿1-THC. Cannabidiol has no effect when injected intraperitoneally in doses up to 100 mg/kg.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)753-763
Number of pages11
JournalBritish Journal of Pharmacology
Volume46
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1972

Cite this

The ring test : A quantitative method for assessing the `cataleptic' effect of cannabis in Mice. / Pertwee, Roger Guy.

In: British Journal of Pharmacology, Vol. 46, No. 4, 12.1972, p. 753-763.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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