The use and abuse of ethnography

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human beings grow into cultural knowledge,within a social and environmental context, rather than receiving it ready made. This seems also to be true of cetaceans. Rendell and Whitehead invoke a notion of culture long since rejected by anthropologists, and fundamentally misunderstand the nature of ethnography. A properly ethnographic study of cetaceans would directly subvert their positivist methodology and reductionist assumptions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)337
Number of pages11
JournalBehavioral and Brain Sciences
Volume24
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Cite this

The use and abuse of ethnography. / Ingold, T .

In: Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Vol. 24, 2001, p. 337.

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

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