Variation in perceptions of physical dominance and trustworthiness predicts individual differences in the effect of relationship context on women's preferences for masculine pitch in men's voices

Jovana Vukovic, Benedict C. Jones, David R. Feinberg, Lisa M. DeBruine, Finlay G. Smith, Lisa L. M. Welling, Anthony C. Little

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Several studies have found that women tend to demonstrate stronger preferences for masculine men as short-term partners than as long-term partners, though there is considerable variation among women in the magnitude of this effect. One possible source of this variation is individual differences in the extent to which women perceive masculine men to possess antisocial traits that are less costly in short-term relationships than in long-term relationships. Consistent with this proposal, here we show that the extent to which women report stronger preferences for men with low (i.e., masculine) voice pitch as short-term partners than as long-term partners is associated with the extent to which they attribute physical dominance and low trustworthiness to these masculine voices. Thus, our findings suggest that variation in the extent to which women attribute negative personality characteristics to masculine men predicts individual differences in the magnitude of the effect of relationship context on women's masculinity preferences, highlighting the importance of perceived personality attributions for individual differences in women's judgements of men's vocal attractiveness and, potentially, their mate preferences.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)37-48
Number of pages12
JournalBritish Journal of Psychology
Volume102
Issue number1
Early online date17 Jan 2011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2011

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Individuality
Personality
Masculinity

Keywords

  • formant frequencies influence
  • self-rated attractiveness
  • male face shape
  • sexual-dimorphism
  • facial attractiveness
  • partnership status
  • temporal context
  • menstrual-cycle
  • testosterone
  • evolution

Cite this

Variation in perceptions of physical dominance and trustworthiness predicts individual differences in the effect of relationship context on women's preferences for masculine pitch in men's voices. / Vukovic, Jovana; Jones, Benedict C.; Feinberg, David R.; DeBruine, Lisa M.; Smith, Finlay G.; Welling, Lisa L. M.; Little, Anthony C.

In: British Journal of Psychology, Vol. 102, No. 1, 02.2011, p. 37-48.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vukovic, Jovana ; Jones, Benedict C. ; Feinberg, David R. ; DeBruine, Lisa M. ; Smith, Finlay G. ; Welling, Lisa L. M. ; Little, Anthony C. / Variation in perceptions of physical dominance and trustworthiness predicts individual differences in the effect of relationship context on women's preferences for masculine pitch in men's voices. In: British Journal of Psychology. 2011 ; Vol. 102, No. 1. pp. 37-48.
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