Violent death and the formation of social structure: Skeletal evidence of violence from the Qijia culture (2,300-1,400BCE), Gansu Provence, China

Jenna M. Dittmar, Hui-Yuan Yeh, Elizabeth S. Berger, Jennifer Austen, Xiaoya Zhan, Mauricio Hernandez, Mao Ruilin, Wang Hui, Piers D. Mitchell

Research output: Contribution to journalAbstractpeer-review

Abstract

This research examines violence as an essential mechanism for the construction of power structures in early complex societies by examining evidence of violent trauma on human skeletal remains from Bronze Age China. An osteological assessment was conducted on 341 individuals (n=213 adults, n=127 juveniles) from the Qijia Culture that were excavated from the Mogou site, Lintan County, Gansu. The pattern of injuries was recorded on each individual to assess if violence changed over the duration of occupation at Mogou.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)69-69
Number of pages1
JournalAmerican Journal of Physical Anthropology
Volume165
Issue numberS66
Early online date17 Apr 2018
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2018
Event87th Annual Meeting of the American-Association-of-Physical-Anthropologists (AAPA) - Austin
Duration: 11 Apr 201814 Apr 2018

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