What is the scale of prescribing errors committed by junior doctors?

A systematic review

Sarah Ross, Christine Bond, Helen Rothnie, Sian Thomas, Mary Joan MacLeod

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

AIMS: Prescribing errors are an important cause of patient safety incidents, generally considered to be made more frequently by junior doctors, but prevalence and causality are unclear. In order to inform the design of an educational intervention, a systematic review of the literature on prescribing errors made by junior doctors was undertaken.

METHODS: Searches were undertaken using the following databases: MEDLINE; EMBASE; Science and Social Sciences Citation Index; CINAHL; Health Management Information Consortium; PsychINFO; ISI Proceedings; The Proceedings of the British Pharmacological Society; Cochrane Library; National Research Register; Current Controlled Trials; and Index to Theses. Studies were selected if they reported prescribing errors committed by junior doctors in primary or secondary care, were in English, published since 1990 and undertaken in Western Europe, North America or Australasia.

RESULTS: Twenty-four studies meeting the inclusion criteria were identified. The range of error rates was 2-514 per 1000 items prescribed and 4.2-82% of patients or charts reviewed. Considerable variation was seen in design, methods, error definitions and error rates reported.

CONCLUSIONS: The review reveals a widespread problem that does not appear to be associated with different training models, healthcare systems or infrastructure. There was a range of designs, methods, error definitions and error rates, making meaningful conclusions difficult. No definitive study of prescribing errors has yet been conducted, and is urgently needed to provide reliable baseline data for interventions aimed at reducing errors. It is vital that future research is well constructed and generalizable using standard definitions and methods.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)629-640
Number of pages12
JournalBritish Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
Volume67
Issue number6
Early online date23 Oct 2008
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2009

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Health Information Management
Australasia
Secondary Care
Social Sciences
Patient Safety
North America
MEDLINE
Causality
Libraries
Primary Health Care
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Delivery of Health Care
Research

Keywords

  • drug prescription
  • medication error
  • physicians
  • in-hospital inpatients
  • pediatric emergency-department
  • prescription errors
  • medication errors
  • order entry
  • pharmacist
  • residency
  • trial

Cite this

What is the scale of prescribing errors committed by junior doctors? A systematic review. / Ross, Sarah; Bond, Christine; Rothnie, Helen; Thomas, Sian; MacLeod, Mary Joan.

In: British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, Vol. 67, No. 6, 06.2009, p. 629-640.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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