When crowding of crowding leads to uncrowding

M. Manassi (Corresponding Author), Bilge Sayim, Michael H Herzog

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Abstract In object recognition, features are thought to be processed in a hierarchical fashion from low-level analysis (edges and lines) to complex figural processing (shapes and objects). Here, we show that figural processing determines low-level processing. Vernier offset discrimination strongly deteriorated when we embedded a vernier in a square. This is a classic crowding effect. Surprisingly, crowding almost disappeared when additional squares were added. We propose that figural interactions between the squares precede low-level suppression of the vernier by the single square, contrary to hierarchical models of object recognition.

Original languageEnglish
Article number10
JournalJournal of Vision
Volume13
Issue number13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2013

Cite this

When crowding of crowding leads to uncrowding. / Manassi, M. (Corresponding Author); Sayim, Bilge; Herzog, Michael H.

In: Journal of Vision, Vol. 13, No. 13, 10, 11.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Manassi, M. ; Sayim, Bilge ; Herzog, Michael H. / When crowding of crowding leads to uncrowding. In: Journal of Vision. 2013 ; Vol. 13, No. 13.
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