Wider nets, bigger fish

Interdisciplinary and comparative approaches to power transformations in early medieval northern Europe

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

The three-year ‘Pathways to Power Project: The Rise of the Early Medieval Kingdoms of the North’, which was funded by the University of Aberdeen’s North Theme Fund from 2012-2015, aimed to integrate archaeological and text-based sources to assess the similarities and differences in the ways in which kingdoms in Scotland, Ireland, and Scandinavia emerged in the early medieval period. Bringing together researchers from the Department of Archaeology and the Centre for Scandinavian Studies, the explicitly interdisciplinary and comparative approach of this project has shed new light on a number of issues that cross-cut preconceived disciplinary and regional/cultural boundaries. This paper will summarise some of the project’s results, and will link them to the issues discussed by some of the other speakers in this double session. In particular, we will discuss key characteristics of seats of power and ritualised practices connected to negotiating or legally claiming power in Scotland, Ireland, and Scandinavia, highlighting common trends that suggest wide-spread mentalities associated with perceptions of power, as well as regional variations that inform us about local political and environmental conditions.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusUnpublished - 2015
EventInternational Congress on Medieval Studies - University of Western Michigan, Kalamazoo, United States
Duration: 14 May 201517 May 2015
Conference number: 50
http://scholarworks.wmich.edu/medieval_cong_archive/50/

Conference

ConferenceInternational Congress on Medieval Studies
CountryUnited States
CityKalamazoo
Period14/05/1517/05/15
Internet address

Fingerprint

Early Medieval Period
Fish
Scandinavia
Ireland
Archaeology
Kingdom
Scotland
Mentality
Cut
Regional Variation
Cultural Boundaries
Pathway

Cite this

Milek, K. B. (2015). Wider nets, bigger fish: Interdisciplinary and comparative approaches to power transformations in early medieval northern Europe. Paper presented at International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, United States.

Wider nets, bigger fish : Interdisciplinary and comparative approaches to power transformations in early medieval northern Europe. / Milek, Karen Beatrice.

2015. Paper presented at International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Milek, KB 2015, 'Wider nets, bigger fish: Interdisciplinary and comparative approaches to power transformations in early medieval northern Europe' Paper presented at International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, United States, 14/05/15 - 17/05/15, .
Milek KB. Wider nets, bigger fish: Interdisciplinary and comparative approaches to power transformations in early medieval northern Europe. 2015. Paper presented at International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, United States.
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