Wilkie Collins’s Monomaniacs in Basil, No Name, and Man and Wife

Helena Ifill (Corresponding Author)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The term monomania, about which Chambers Edinburgh Journal is so concerned, became popular in Britain from the 1830s onwards as a means of describing a form of “partial insanity” in which a person was apparently insane in only one way.1 Insanity could take the form of an erroneous belief, a persistent impulse, or a recurring hallucination which was referred to as a “fixed” or “dominant idea”.
Original languageEnglish
JournalWilkie Collins Journal
Volume12
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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Wives
Insanity
Names
Person
Hallucinations
1830s
Edinburgh
Impulse

Cite this

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