Wing temperature in flying bats measured by infrared thermography

W C Lancaster, C Thomson, John Roger Speakman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

1. We collected data on the wing temperature of flying bats using infrared thermal imaging to assess the thermoregulatory function of wing membranes.

2. Thermographic images of two Egyptian Fruit Bats, Rousettus aegyptiacus were captured as they flew along a 12 m length of corridor.

3. Body temperature was measured before the first flight and immediately after flight sequences using a rectal thermister probe.

4. Temperatures across the wing ranged from 34 degrees C near the forearm muscle mass, to less than 24 degrees C at the trailing edge (mean ambient temperature 23 degrees C). The majority of the wing was 1-2 degrees C above ambient temperature.

5. We found small, but significant changes in body temperature during flight. These changes did not correlate with changes in wing temperature. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)109-116
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Thermal Biology
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1997

Keywords

  • bat
  • flight
  • thermoregulation
  • infrared thermography
  • flight physiology
  • pulse emission
  • pigeon
  • pteropodidae
  • echolocation
  • tunnel
  • rates
  • power

Cite this

Wing temperature in flying bats measured by infrared thermography. / Lancaster, W C ; Thomson, C; Speakman, John Roger.

In: Journal of Thermal Biology, Vol. 22, No. 2, 04.1997, p. 109-116.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{bb0048b6c10a493ebfa8e4ea3b72b320,
title = "Wing temperature in flying bats measured by infrared thermography",
abstract = "1. We collected data on the wing temperature of flying bats using infrared thermal imaging to assess the thermoregulatory function of wing membranes.2. Thermographic images of two Egyptian Fruit Bats, Rousettus aegyptiacus were captured as they flew along a 12 m length of corridor.3. Body temperature was measured before the first flight and immediately after flight sequences using a rectal thermister probe.4. Temperatures across the wing ranged from 34 degrees C near the forearm muscle mass, to less than 24 degrees C at the trailing edge (mean ambient temperature 23 degrees C). The majority of the wing was 1-2 degrees C above ambient temperature.5. We found small, but significant changes in body temperature during flight. These changes did not correlate with changes in wing temperature. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.",
keywords = "bat, flight, thermoregulation, infrared thermography, flight physiology, pulse emission, pigeon, pteropodidae, echolocation, tunnel, rates, power",
author = "Lancaster, {W C} and C Thomson and Speakman, {John Roger}",
year = "1997",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1016/S0306-4565(96)00039-3",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "109--116",
journal = "Journal of Thermal Biology",
issn = "0306-4565",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Wing temperature in flying bats measured by infrared thermography

AU - Lancaster, W C

AU - Thomson, C

AU - Speakman, John Roger

PY - 1997/4

Y1 - 1997/4

N2 - 1. We collected data on the wing temperature of flying bats using infrared thermal imaging to assess the thermoregulatory function of wing membranes.2. Thermographic images of two Egyptian Fruit Bats, Rousettus aegyptiacus were captured as they flew along a 12 m length of corridor.3. Body temperature was measured before the first flight and immediately after flight sequences using a rectal thermister probe.4. Temperatures across the wing ranged from 34 degrees C near the forearm muscle mass, to less than 24 degrees C at the trailing edge (mean ambient temperature 23 degrees C). The majority of the wing was 1-2 degrees C above ambient temperature.5. We found small, but significant changes in body temperature during flight. These changes did not correlate with changes in wing temperature. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.

AB - 1. We collected data on the wing temperature of flying bats using infrared thermal imaging to assess the thermoregulatory function of wing membranes.2. Thermographic images of two Egyptian Fruit Bats, Rousettus aegyptiacus were captured as they flew along a 12 m length of corridor.3. Body temperature was measured before the first flight and immediately after flight sequences using a rectal thermister probe.4. Temperatures across the wing ranged from 34 degrees C near the forearm muscle mass, to less than 24 degrees C at the trailing edge (mean ambient temperature 23 degrees C). The majority of the wing was 1-2 degrees C above ambient temperature.5. We found small, but significant changes in body temperature during flight. These changes did not correlate with changes in wing temperature. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.

KW - bat

KW - flight

KW - thermoregulation

KW - infrared thermography

KW - flight physiology

KW - pulse emission

KW - pigeon

KW - pteropodidae

KW - echolocation

KW - tunnel

KW - rates

KW - power

U2 - 10.1016/S0306-4565(96)00039-3

DO - 10.1016/S0306-4565(96)00039-3

M3 - Article

VL - 22

SP - 109

EP - 116

JO - Journal of Thermal Biology

JF - Journal of Thermal Biology

SN - 0306-4565

IS - 2

ER -