Young-earth creationists in early nineteenth-century Britain? Towards a reassessment of 'Scriptural geology'

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The article presents a study that aims to set out some of the challenges in the history of science. According to author, the so-called scriptural geologists continue to occupy an anomalous position in the historiography. Accounts of the development of geology routinely make reference to figures like Granville Penn and Andrew Ure, yet they have rarely been the primary subjects of historical research. In this article, the author also attempts to clear the ground for future research by removing some common misconceptions, and to demonstrate that literalist writing on earth history deserves serious historical attention.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)357-403
Number of pages47
JournalHistory of Science
Volume45
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2007

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Misconceptions
History
Historical Research
Nineteenth-century Britain
Creationist
History of the Sciences
Historiography
Geology

Cite this

Young-earth creationists in early nineteenth-century Britain? Towards a reassessment of 'Scriptural geology'. / O'Connor, Ralph James.

In: History of Science, Vol. 45, No. 4, 12.2007, p. 357-403.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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