Zeta potential of CO2-rich aqueous solutions in contact with intact sandstone sample at temperatures of 23°C and 40°C and pressures up to 10.0 MPa

Miftah Hidayat, Mohammad Sarmadivaleh, Jos Derksen, David Vega-Maza, Stefan Iglauer, Jan Vinogradov* (Corresponding Author)

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Despite the broad range of interest and applications, controls on the electric surface charge and the zeta potential of silica in contact with aqueous solutions saturated with dissolved CO2 at conditions relevant to natural systems, remains unreported. There have been no published zeta potential measurements conducted in such systems at equilibrium, hence the effect of composition, pH, temperature and pressure remains unknown.

We describe a novel methodology developed for the streaming potential measurements under these conditions, and report zeta potential values for the first time obtained with Fontainebleau sandstone core sample saturated with carbonated NaCl, Na2SO4, CaCl2 and MgCl2 solutions under equilibrium conditions at pressures up to 10 MPa and temperatures up to 40°C.

The results demonstrate that pH of solutions is the only control on the zeta potential, while temperature, CO2 pressure and salt type affect pH values. We report three empirical relationships that describe the pH dependence of the zeta potential for: i) dead (partial CO2 pressure of 10-3.44 atm) NaCl/Na2SO4, ii) dead CaCl2/MgCl2 solutions, and iii) for all live (fully saturated with dissolved CO2) solutions. The proposed new relationships provide essential insights into interfacial electrochemical properties of silica-water systems at conditions relevant to CO2 geological storage.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Colloid and Interface Science
Early online date17 Sep 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 17 Sep 2021

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