The relative contributions of vitamin C, carotenoids and phenolics to the antioxidant potential of fruit juices

P T Gardner, T A C White, D B McPhail, G G Duthie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

463 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The health benefit of fruit juices have been ascribed, in part, to phenolic antioxidants. The antioxidant potential of a range of fruit juices was assessed by measurement of their ability to reduce a synthetic free radical, potassium nitrosodisulphonate, and also by their ability to reduce Fe(III). Vitamin C was found to account for 65-100% of the antioxidant potential of beverages derived from citrus fruit but less than 5% of apple and pineapple juice. The contribution of carotenoids to antioxidant potential was negligible. Although phenolics appear to be major contributors to the antioxidant potential of the non-citrus juices, their identity and bio-availability requires further investigation. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)471-474
Number of pages4
JournalFood Chemistry
Volume68
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2000

Keywords

  • antioxidant capacity
  • fruit juices
  • performance liquid-chromatography
  • plasma
  • flavonoids
  • disease

Cite this

The relative contributions of vitamin C, carotenoids and phenolics to the antioxidant potential of fruit juices. / Gardner, P T ; White, T A C ; McPhail, D B ; Duthie, G G.

In: Food Chemistry, Vol. 68, No. 4, 03.2000, p. 471-474.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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